Candidate Forum Questionnaire

1. The price of homes reflect the supply and demand of the market. The price point (much higher than most locals can afford) implies that there is enough non-local people purchasing properties to keep the prices out of range of most residents. What will you do to address the housing crisis we now face and make homeownership more affordable?

Sherry Alu Campanga

First, I support the Constitutional Amendment which would

  1. capture tax revenue from real estate investors,
  2.  slow the real property investor market, and
  3. create a dedicated funding stream for our public education system, which in the long run, helps our local families and economy.

Second, I will work to ensure that the HUD programs in Hawaii continue and will explore options to expand HUD programming so that more people from our local community can be served. Third, I will ensure that VA funding for housing continues and press for efficiencies in the that program. Fourth, I will work to ensure that DHHL is refocused on serving Native Hawaiians by moving people off of the waiting list and onto their land.

Tulsi Gabbard

One of the most important issues facing our state is the cost of living, which is among
the highest in the nation, and everyday families struggle just to get by. Meanwhile, the
homeless crisis continues. Our residents need truly affordable housing—that is why I
have long advocated building up, rather than out, on Oʻahu to make the most of our
limited land, preserving as much open space and agricultural land as possible. We
cannot sit idly by as the people of Hawaiʻi are being priced out of our own housing
market. We\'ve become a playground for the wealthy—many condos and homes sell for
millions, yet sit empty 90% of the time, while other homes are used as vacation rentals,
increasing the price for all of Hawaii\'s housing and making it increasingly difficult for
families with limited resources to find a safe place to live, to put food on the table, and to
make ends meet.
In Congress, I’ve worked to secure more federal funding for affordable housing
programs in Hawai‘i, like Section 8, as well as programs which help empower local
families to be able to afford a home through programs like Low Income Housing Tax
Credits. I’ve worked to pass legislation that reauthorized and funded the Native
American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act (NAHASDA), which has been
critical to increasing home ownership among Native Hawaiians over the last thirty years.

I will continue to fight for more affordable housing units through public and private
projects and make sure they stay affordable in perpetuity—not flipped and sold for profit,
as we’ve seen occur far too often. I will continue fighting to streamline many of the
regulations that burden families in Windward Oʻahu and across Hawaiʻi and increase
flexibility to empower state and local housing agencies, as well as private developers, to
create and build new housing options. Our affordable housing shortage is a crisis that

requires every level of government, the private sector, and community taking action
toward a solution.

Anthony Austin

Home ownership rate in Hawai’I ranked 47 among the 50 states and the District of
Columbia, Housing Vacancy rate ranked 16 among the same 50 states and Hawai’I
ranked 19 th among the 50 states in per capital Personal Income. I think we need to raise
income levels so that Hawai’I home ownership is achievable.

Brian Evans
Law must be passed that protects locals from being unable to afford their rights to enjoy their lives and pursue their goals. We must limit the amount of out of state investments unless there is some sort of program that gives back to the community and doesn’t cast out the locals who have more of a right to be in Hawaii than we do.
Ken Ito
State and Counties should plan together and support all pulbic infrastructures. Many areas need sewer lines to increase capacity. HB 2748 just sign by Gov. Ige to provide finacing and incentive to affordable housing developors.
Jarret Keohokalole
The lack of affordable housing is the top issue facing our district. A big part of the solution for our community is building more housing in the urban core to take pressure off of the Windward side. I’m proud that as Majority Policy Leader, I played a part in passing the $570 million housing bill this year which will create 25,000 workforce rental housing units by 2030. This is a huge step in the right direction, and will maximize our tax dollars to go toward housing development for lower and middle-income families. While this bill won’t completely solve the crisis, it is a significant step in helping to address the shortage of real affordable housing units. Long-term, we need to continue to make investments in infrastructure--especially in the urban core and mass-transit corridor--to ensure that we can accommodate enough housing density to keep up with population growth. That is the only feasible way to make housing accessible to working class families on Oahu. In addition, we must crack down on the proliferation of transient vacation units on the Windward side. We should empower the counties to address this issue responsibly. We must find creative ways to disincentivize wealthy investors who are purchasing multiple properties (many of which aren’t owner-occupied) and driving up housing costs while taking inventory off the market for local people trying to raise their families in Hawai‘i.
Natalia Hussey-Burdick
The affordable housing crisis has deeply impacted almost everyone I grew up with. Many of our local residents are forced to move to the mainland after getting priced out of homes they’ve lived in for generations, while rich foreign spectators continue to buy multiple homes which often remain vacant or become illegal vacation rentals. This creates a heavy burden for our state and the working families who live here. With high demand and limited supply of housing, home prices will keep rising unless we do something to increase supply or reduce demand. We can build to a certain extent, but neither our environment nor our infrastructure can handle much more, so I propose that the first solution we prioritize is to provide tax credits for resident homeowners and first-time homebuyers, and simultaneously close the tax loophole that currently allows Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) to take billions of dollars of investment revenues out of Hawaii without paying a dime in State income tax.
Scott Matayoshi
We need to do (at least) two things: 1) build more housing for working families, and 2) stop illegal vacation rentals that are taking housing units off the market. I want to see more basic workforce housing built in Honolulu’s urban core. 801 South is an excellent example of using innovative building techniques to build housing for the people of Hawaii. The government should be encouraging this kind of development, while protecting this housing from outside investors. Illegal vacation rentals are suffocating the housing market by violating zoning ordinances, destroying neighborhoods, and allowing people to profit off of their illegal activity- all while paying no taxes. We need a major crackdown on illegal vacation rentals, with more investigators to bring claims and a rule against negotiating down fines. Our leaders need to stand strong against forces that are resisting a crackdown.
Mo Radke

Working families in the low and middle-income brackets are most affected by high
housing costs and often have to work additional jobs to achieve home ownership. Home
prices are driven up as mainland or overseas investors see opportunity to buy a home,
rent it out for profit, and reap the benefits of appreciative market value and structure
depreciation. All those elements make home ownership a boon for outsiders and
artificially raises the price for locals. It’s no wonder why local want to get in on that
investment as well.

To make home ownership more affordable:

  • Help the building industry to create more housing starts by eliminating the 30% low-
    income housing requirement.
  • Require first opportunity for local housing and low-income lotteries to be made
    available to Hawai‘i residents and attaching a binder prohibiting resale within a 5 or
    10-year period.
  • Enable the City and State, with their voluminous property assets, to develop specific
    low-income housing similar to the military Public Private Venture (PPV) concept.
  • Ensure the PPV properties meet a new standard of expected requirements and
    create a neighborhood that inspires ownership, a sense of place, and a general good
    feeling of safety and where people treat each other with respect and decency.
  • Design an efficient, aesthetically pleasing development that residents will be proud of
    and will protect.
Shannon Kaui Dalire
Kika Bukoski
Affordable Housing for local residents is one of my top priorities, and something that I have been involved in for the last 8-10 years. A recent study (Hawaiʻi Housing Planning Study 2016) reported a current shortage of housing supply statewide of 65,000 units. In 2005, the late Barbara Marshall declared Hawaiʻi’s housing situation as critical, and at a ‘CRISIS’ level, and here we sit, over thirteen years later and the situation doesn’t appear to be getting any better. Housing is a basic need that should be enjoyed by and afforded by all income levels. There are several issues that I believe, are impacting Hawaiʻi’s shortage of housing at levels that are affordable to local residents, 1) The lack of political will. Approximately 80% of the demand for housing is at income levels of 100% and below area median income (AMI), yet the majority of the units being constructed are at levels of 120 to 140% (AMI) and higher. Hawaiʻi as a highly sought-after destination for those nearing retirement age will likely continue to attract mainland buyers as fast as they can be built. The baby-boomer generation (one of the largest generational blocks) will continue to play a significant role in non-resident housing demand. With this in mind, we must identify ways to incentivize local developers and government agencies to build to our local resident market at income levels that they can afford. 2) Protecting our neighborhoods and protecting local resident’s ability to fairly compete in the local housing market. I believe part of trying to control home pricing is addressing transient vacation rentals and how this market has and will continue to influence Hawaiʻi’s housing market. As I walk the Ko’olaupoko district of Kāneʻohe/Kahaluʻu, I see numerous amounts of what appears to be operating TVUʻs (illegally), although according to City and County data, there is only one legally permitted TVU in all of Kāneʻohe/Kahaluʻu. I am told of situations where homeowners are proactively solicited and enticed into selling their homes for cash over and above market price, which artificially drives the cost of homes as well as property taxes upwards and out of the reach of local residents. There was legislation introduced in the 2018 legislative session that was intended to provide enforcment tools and a method by which the city and state can begin to get a handle on the TVU market and not only collect its fair share of related taxes, but crack down on the illegal operations that are destroying our neighborhoods. Unfortunately, this piece of legislation was not passed. I support any effort to address illegal TVUʻs and to level the playing field for local residents. 3) Lacking Infrastructure. The city passed a promising ordinance that allows homeowners to construct accessory dwelling units on their property as a means to increase potential rental inventory and assist local homeowners make ends meet and off-set the rising cost of living. Unfortunately, many home owners in Kāneʻohe/Kahauʻu who attempted to take advantage of such laws were denied because of a lack of sewer capacity. The recent completion of the Kāneʻohe/Kailua Sewer Tunnel project however, will allow some of the previously denied applicants the opportunity to now re-apply for such approvals. This is just one example of how all too often, infrastructure continues to lag behind community demand. I strongly support a more pro-active approach to ensuring that infrastructure is maintained and upgraded to meet the current and anticipated demands of the community. I support policy that encourages government to investment in infrastructure during economic downturns in anticipation for its recovery. Doing so, will allow projects to go forward when they are needed the most. 4) Construct truly affordable housing. I support efforts that increase the inventory of affordable homes. I think the City and State have made some good effort in this area – the State’s allocating funds towards the Hawaiʻi Housing Revolving Fund that HHFDC administers, providing gap funding for affordable housing developers. On the City level, incentives provided via Transient Oriented Development (TOD) provide developers with added value via height and density bonuses in exchange for a certain level of affordable housing. Additionally, Bill 59 was passed that provides fee waivers and other incentives to developers outside of TOD zones. I support state policy that enhance and compliment such city housing efforts, as well as providing additional incentives to developers who propose 100% affordable housing projects.
Randy Gonce

Supply and demand yes but also it reflects the current prioritization our economy has on investment over shelter. When we talk about our housing crisis we must speak about the current economic model we choose to operate in. It is one that currently gives tax breaks to the most wealthy developers yet leaves the local consumer to purchase homes at rates giving the developer the highest amount of profit at the expense of our local people. This top down ʻneo-classical’ economic model has dominated for decades. We keep trying to solve symptoms of this larger problem with bandaids such as putting $500 million into a revolving fund hoping that it will eventually lead to developers building ‘affordable’ units. What we really need is a complete rethinking of our economic model and what it values the most. Are we going to continue to value profit above all or can we demand that our market value human qualities that improve our lives? Also, large foreign investment in to our housing market is making it impossible to compete in. Especially when the salaries in Hawaiʻi are some of the lowest on average. We must stop commodifying housing making it a privledge. We need a change in economic thought.

Lisa Kitagawa

As a local resident raised in a single-parent, working-class family, Hawai‘i’s housing
crisis personally affects me and my entire family on a daily basis. Although my husband
and I both work full-time, our combined incomes are not enough to be able to afford a
house in today’s market. Like many other long-time local families, this means living in
my parent’s house and raising my children in the same place I grew up. Although we
are fortunate to have a place to live for now, not having the keys to our own home
means our housing situation will continue to remain an uncertainty especially as market
prices continue to climb throughout our neighborhood and the state.
As a legislator, I will push for housing development and legislation that make
homeownership more affordable for our middle income and working-class families. We
need to support affordable housing efforts, such as rental housing and workforce
housing. Having worked at the State Legislature as an Office Manager, I know first-hand
how challenging it is to pass legislation that supports affordable housing. That is why, if
elected, I will support continuing the efforts that the Legislature began this year by
providing funding to the State Rental Housing Fund, as well as expanding the excise tax
exemption for construction on affordable rental housing, which will encourage the
development of new affordable rental units.

Jessica Wooley

Yes, the price point for homes makes ownership out of reach for most families who live in
Hawai`i. When combined with the high cost of goods and services, low wages and government
taxes, structures and regulations, it’s amazing working families can make it. In fact, it is
increasingly clear that sometimes, they can’t. More and more, working families are struggling to
keep a roof over their heads.
That’s why I have worked on the housing crisis and preventing unwarranted evictions in Hawai`i
since my first job out of law school, at the Legal Aid Society of Hawai`i. I have fought for
people’s rights to land and housing ever since. When I first ran for office and won in 2008, the
first issue I raised in the campaign was to challenge the Governor’s and the Department of Land
and Natural Resources’ (DLNR) decision to evict 6 families from Kahana Valley (DLNR did not
want people to live there and an attorney general opinion supported that decision). After winning
the election, I worked with the community, wrote the bill and worked with House and Senate
leaders to override Gov. Lingle’s veto and successfully prevent the evictions, establish a
community-led planning process and allow new leases to be issued in Kahana. If elected, I’m
not just going to talk about supporting and working on these issues -- I will take actions and
continue to fight for our most vulnerable, regardless of the opposition.
The housing crisis demands more action, leadership and ideas in addition to existing efforts.
There are a variety of strategies, not one silver bullet – but we must and can resolve this crisis
while also keeping the country country and adjusting to climate change realities. If elected, I will
stand up and fight for affordable housing and struggling, working families in our community with
policies that make sense, for now and future generations. As demonstrated by my actions time
and time again, I will stand by the community; I will not stand by, be quiet for or support
unwarranted luxury developments promoted by misled executives or foreign companies, even if
they pretend to address the housing crisis -- no matter the pressure.
Policies and bills I support include tax reform to reduce the burdens on working families (so they
can afford to rent, buy or build a home); tax reform to incentivize affordable housing

construction, repair and maintenance; easing restrictions on work-force housing and tiny-
homes; promoting public-private partnerships and redevelopment; building up and with transit

oriented development in Kapolei, the 2nd City; offset fees for investment properties; the building
of `ohana zones; collaboration and cooperation between federal, state, city and county, private
and non-profit organizations to build and provide housing (including increasing federal funds for
public housing); and requiring Executive agencies prioritize families over foreign corporations

(e.g., the Department of Agriculture and Agribusiness Development Corporation should prioritize
agricultural leases for family farms over foreign corporations).
Also, while talking to residents door-to-door in the community, I learned firsthand how some
abandoned/derelict homes and properties get lost in government regulatory systems and
deplete housing stock. We don’t need empty houses, band-aids and bureaucracy; we need
actions and commitments to solutions that really work. If elected, I will organize around and
advocate for the solutions people in my district support, including but not limited to those
described above.

Cynthia Thielen

UNPERMITTED TRANSIENT VACATION UNITS ARE REMOVING GREAT CHUNKS OF
HOUSING FROM THE LOCAL MARKET. THE CITY AND COUNTY HAS FAILED TO
ENFORCE ITS HOUSING ORDINANCES, ALLOWING THE LACK OF HOUSING FOR
LOCALS TO ESCALATE. I HAVE SUPPORTED, AND WILL CONTINUE TO SUPPORT
LEGISLATION TO STRENGHTEN LAWS, SO LOCAL HOUSING CAN RETURN TO LOCALS,
AT A PRICE THEY CAN AFFORD, RATHER THAN AN INFLATED PRICE BASED ON
ILLEGAL RENTAL INCOME.

Micah Pregitzer

I think the first step is to enforce the current laws regarding vacation rentals in Hawaii more stringently.  Once that is done then we can look at possibly allowing short term rentals of rooms or ADUs for owner-occupied properties to help provide an additional income for residents.

Miles Shiratori

I would encourage more private sector investments in existing affordable housing properties
where federal funding has failed.
I would encourage re-purposing of existing real estate into rental apartments. I would also
provide tax rebates or other incentives for apartment building owners who voluntarily set aside a
certain number of their existing apartments as affordable housing.
I would expand tax incentive programs for lower cost development, reduce or eliminating
property taxes on new construction of affordable housing, adjust zoning requirements etc. There
are a lot of other solutions we can look at also.

Adriel Lam

There are two distinct issues in this question. First, we need to define what is local and
non-local. If someone comes to Kaneohe and adopts and lives local Kaneohe values,
can they not also become local too? Let’s make that more apparent by highlighting
values that make Kaneohe unique. You can’t keep people from wanting to live in the best
little town in the world, but we can instill our values instead of letting outside values
replace ours. Let’s ensure that we #SharetheAloha, show people how we #LiveKuleana,
and #InspireOhana to those that come to our town.

Affordable housing is a nation-wide problem stemming from unfettered housing policies
that sent housing prices skyrocketing. We need to bring back market discipline, provide
incentives for long-term homeownership, and enforce mechanisms that were intended to
help qualified persons in need. Increasing the housing supply is one-way to adjust the
price point, but let’s also look at other ways to accommodate those in need, without
sacrificing the interests of our existing residents and neighbors. Let the people of
Kaneohe decide what’s in the best interest for our town.

2. We have seen an increase in homelessness on the Windward side. What are your short term and long term goals to address this?

Sherry Alu Campanga

In the short term, we need to identify State properties that will provide transitional housing for families and the working poor. We also need to change State legislation that effectively makes it illegal to house minors so that we can put unaccompanied, homeless minors in their own safe, transitional housing. We have identified the Hawaii Youth Correctional Facility as a place where this type of housing could be developed. I will also work to ensure that we have HUD, VA, and DOI funding to create housing support for the populations (working poor, veterans, and native people) who are most at risk for homelessness.

Tulsi Gabbard

In Congress, I have fought for more resources to support important programs that
directly serve our homeless population—and I will continue fighting for these critical
resources. Hawaii’s soaring cost of living and extreme shortage of truly affordable
housing has made it very hard, if not impossible, for many local families to make ends
meet and has contributed to the homeless crisis we face today.
As I mentioned above, I’ve worked to secure more federal funding for affordable housing
programs in Hawai‘i, like Section 8, as well as programs which help empower local
families to be able to afford a home through programs like Low Income Housing Tax
Credits. I’ve also introduced legislation that reauthorizes and funds the Native American
Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act (NAHASDA), which passed in the
House unanimously and has been critical to increasing home ownership among Native
Hawaiians over the last thirty years. Nearly 30% of the homeless population in Hawaiʻi is
comprised of Native Hawaiians. The Department of Hawaiian Home Lands (DHHL) is
the sole recipient of the Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant and administers 203,000
acres of trust land. Of those lands, 99% are located in Hawaii’s Second Congressional
District.
Securing federal funding for programs that increase the construction of affordable
housing and connect them to our low-income families, veterans, Native Hawaiians, and
others remain among my top priorities in Congress. Still, we need increased action at
every level of government, social service non-profits, and the private sector to
aggressively address this crisis and ensure available resources are being used to help
those most in need.
In January 2018, I worked with Hawaii’s federal delegation to secure over $11 million in
federal funding to support 35 homeless assistance programs in Hawaiʻi. I have fought
hard against predatory banking legislation that rolls back consumer protections and
targets low-income and minority communities. I voted against the Financial CHOICE Act
of 2017 (H.R. 10), the Home Mortgage Disclosure Adjustment Act (H.R. 2954), and the
Protecting Consumers’ Access to Credit Act of 2017 (H.R. 3299), which benefit banks
and lenders over consumers and significantly weaken the Consumer Financial
Protection Bureau.

Anthony Austin

We need to address our house less population by investing more resources in education
and social workers to get our house less population into homes.

Brian Evans
Increase taxes on the sale of homes to out of state (and out of country) investors to provide housing. If they want to buy here, they need to help more than themselves.
Ken Ito
The Legislature has allotated 200 million to help the homeless (GF), 50 million for medicial and legal services to the homeless and a total of 570 million from the GET exemption expire in 30 years. He also allocated 30 million for the 6 areas of Ohana Zones. Now that we have the Legislation hopefully, the recommendation of the various task forces on homelessness can be implementment.
Jarret Keohokalole
In the short term, my priority is to work with the administration to ensure that the Windward side receives our fair share of the $50 million in total statewide funding that we appropriated this year to address homelessness. In the long term, the way that we deal with homelessness must change. We need to create a more integrated approach to care and treatment among our social service providers, health care providers, and first responders and provide them with the necessary tools to do their jobs. In order to make true change on this, we also need to invest in addressing the symptoms that lead to homelessness. This includes building more affordable housing and more support for mental health and substance abuse treatment. By doing these things, we can better prevent people from falling into homelessness and create pathways to get people out.
Natalia Hussey-Burdick
I grew up on the Windward side, and I have seen the dramatic increase in homelessness from year to year. There are many reasons for this, from lack of affordable housing to the heavy influx of drugs to our islands. The good news is, with so many different causes, there are multiple things we can do in the short and long term to help. In the short term, we desperately need more service providers to help our houseless veterans, youth, and families get back on their feet. We currently only have 3 social workers to serve all the homeless individuals from Kahaluu to Waimanalo, there is no way they can keep up with the workload. With so many diverse causes of homelessness, the only way to get our houseless ohana off the street is to take an individualized approach and help each person connect with the services they need for their situation. In the long term, we need to address the root causes of homelessness. These are often long, difficult processes to implement but we can start by reducing the barriers to higher education and trade schools, raising wages so working families can afford housing, improving access to mental health care, and providing transitional services to high risk groups.
Scott Matayoshi
Homelessness is a multifaceted problem with no “silver bullet” solution. In the short-term, I want to see the mentally ill homeless medically treated to take them off the streets. There is a promising program called H4 that, if successful, I would like to replicate on the Windward coast and elsewhere in the State. More information can be found here: http://www.h4hawaii.org/. For those homeless who simply lack the skills needed to hold a job, we should offer counseling and training to teach them the skills they lack. Our unemployment rate is low- Hawaii can use every working body it can muster, which will also increase our tax base. Long-term, we need to get at the root of homelessness, which stems from both societal influences and a lack of a good educational system. As a former public school teacher, I intend to make education my top priority. We must prepare students to enter the workforce when they graduate from high school, as not every student will attend college. I want to increase vocational training and giving both teachers and schools the resources they need to engage students. We also need to support working families to allow them the time to raise our keiki with good values and a good work ethic.
Mo Radke

In our society, we have a standard that allows citizens to act upon their free will.
Sometimes that includes making decisions that are harmful to themselves or others.
If one does harm to themselves, the standard of intervention is haphazard and only as
good as the engagement. We need better and more consistent judicial interface for
those who refuse help and support or refuse medications. I believe it’s our duty to help
a person in need or crisis– the reason being, that if a person is not functioning clearly
and creates a danger to themselves or others, governmental intervention should be an
acceptable solution to get them the services they need.

For broader solutions:

  • Identify the agencies and/or entities that are producing results

  • Assess their desire to remain as-is or gauge interest in growth of the agency or
    entity.

     

  • Provide necessary business support, funding and training to complement growth and
    still maintain or improve the level of services provided.

Shannon Kaui Dalire
Kika Bukoski
I support legislation recently passed to asssit with Hawaiʻiʻs homeless crisis– Law Enforcement Assisted LEAD, ʻOhana Zones, Family Assessment Center, Housing First, Medica Respite Program and so on...all of which will require a certain amount of funding going forward. In short, my opinion is that homelessness is multi-pronged. We have to identify who belongs where. You have the truly homeless, the working homeless, the mentally-challenged, the criminal element – and we have to come up with ways to identify and address each of these categories. One solution does not fit all. Although I believe we need to help people in need get on their feet, we also need to be firm – I support policy that assist those in need but encourages self-determination and self-reliance that allows people to improve their current state and remove themselves from homelessness. OHA introduced a great bill (with little to no fiscal impact to the state) this past session that was drafted to help the working homeless save up for their first and last month’s rent deposit, to get into a home. Unfortunately, this bill did not pass. I don’t believe we should necessarily criminalize the homeless, but we should maintain a certain degree of community standards. We must help those in need, and appropriately address those that are abusing the community with behavior that is unacceptable – defecating in public places, leaving large piles of trash everywhere, etc. – we need to support our community and adopt community standards that protect our communities and law-abiding citizens as well. I support state efforts to leverage additional funds that allow for more private investment and construction of affordable homes/transitional housing for housing first candidates, identifying vacant and/or underutilized state lands that can be used to develop comprehensive affordable housing projects and/or communities, and working with the city and county to reduce costs related to developing transitional/affordable housing projects for the very low income earners.
Randy Gonce

Our campaign is already adressing and working to solve this issue. One main concern is that there are only 2 outreach workers for our windward homeless. All the money they are throwing at this problem and we do not have a robust ground team to meet, talk, and work with our homeless population. This is the single most effective way to solve this issue. The Windward side has been hosting homeless outreach fairs and they have been great. We need more promotion and going to where our homeless live to promote these events but our first one at Kaneohe District Park was fantastic. So many people got signed up for services, got a hot meal, and now are one step closer to getting off the street. We need more of these types of events. We need more compassion around this issue. We need more individuals who are willing to meet our homeless population where they are and we also need much more mental health services. Mental health services

Lisa Kitagawa

Growing up in Kāne‘ohe, I have definitely seen an increase in homelessness in our
community. In high school, my youth group put a service project together to feed the
homeless in our community. We spent an afternoon looking for individuals who were
homeless and in need of food. We found one individual and he declined our help.
Today, you can find individuals in need of food and shelter throughout Kāne‘ohe and
Windward Oahu, which shows how much our community has changed over the years
and how great the need is to support those who are homeless.
Some of my short-term goals are to continue to partner with available services that are
already focusing on addressing homelessness across the State, such as IHS and the Waikiki Health Center. Non-profits, community groups, and churches on the Windward
side offer an additional resource to assist in a holistic strategy to reduce homelessness
and help individuals transition into self-sufficiency.
Some of my long-term goals include addressing the various reasons for homelessness
on the Windward side, which includes mental health, drug and substance abuse, and
individuals who are just not making enough to make ends meet. It is also important to
support children that are homeless and partner with the educational system to provide
additional support for them.
On a state-wide level, I believe that we are in a homelessness crisis and we cannot
continue with the status quo. I support the Legislature’s efforts to create ʻohana zones
for homeless individuals, so that there is a place for homeless individuals and families to
go (instead of having them move from community to community). ʻOhana zones provide
an interim answer to our homelessness crisis and provide a safe place for people to
live, which will improve the health and well-being of homeless individuals by providing
them with access to much needed services. The goal is to get homeless individuals into
permanent housing, however, ʻohana zones can be a temporary solution as permanent
housing gets built.
As a legislator, I will be constantly looking at additional solutions to our State’s and
community’s homelessness crisis and will be open to discussing new ways to help
remediate the problem.

Jessica Wooley

(Please also see my answer in number 1, above.) My first glimpse of the world, as an educated
adult, was as an attorney whose job was to help families keep a roof over their head when they
faced legal challenges but could not afford an attorney. Since then, I have been committed to
resolving the housing crisis in Hawai`i as well as creating a future without hunger or poverty. I
have and will always fight for people’s rights to land, food, healthcare (including mental health
and addiction treatment) and housing – whether as a lawyer, representative, Executive agency
director, parent or human being.
In the short term, if re-elected, my goals would be to take actions to fund community programs
that serve the homeless (i.e., provide food, toilets, showers, temporary shelter), ensure we fix
our mental hospitals and increase mental health and addiction treatment services, support
churches and other organizations able to assist and do everything I can in collaboration with
others to eliminate hunger and poverty. I also will advocate for and develop long-term solutions
in collaboration with diverse groups and individuals who have expertise and determination to
solve problems. For example, I am already working with residents and organizations to write a
bill to create a 10-year public-private partnership to support an Addiction and Fetal Alcohol
Spectrum Disorder Center (based on models from other countries and state programs) that will
help address root causes of homelessness.
In the long term, if elected, my goals would be introduce and pass bills as well as ensure capital
improvement project and budget decisions are made to increase the stock of affordable housing
and homeless shelters (please also see my answer to number 1 above and short-term goals
above); ensure State Executive branch agencies lease vacant land ethically, transparently and
more appropriately (i.e., prioritize local families rather than foreign corporations); support
providing health care, mental and addiction treatment to all in need; and find new ways to end
hunger and poverty.
I am uniquely qualified and capable -- with my education, experience and background -- to
address these issues and I know government can do much better. I am the only candidate
running for this seat able to solve the toughest of challenges and effectively fight for you at the

legislature; I am independent, determined to succeed and beholden to no special interest except
my community.

Cynthia Thielen

SHORT TERM, WE ALLOCATED FUNDS FOR THE GOVERNOR TO PROVIDE MORE
HOMELESS SERVICES AND SHELTERS. LONG TERM, I SUPPORT USING STATE LAND
OF DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY TO HOUSE YOUNGER HOMELESS IN KAILUA.

Micah Pregitzer

Short and long term, I would want to provide temporary living assistance to give many of these individuals the help they need to get back on their feet and their lives going again.  Long term, I think the new state mental health facility being constructed near WCC will be able to provide help for those in the homeless community that need that extra care

Miles Shiratori

I would provide temporary housing, especially for our working homeless. I would in the long
term work with the community, business leaders , union leaders and other repersentative to
provide jobs and provide job training in the fields that these people are interested in. As they join
the work force, they will help to increase our tax base and tax revenues.
Also establish homeless centers that would have bathroom and shower facilities, cooking
facilities and an area where they can put up a tent temporarily, but there will be rules and
regulations that they will have to follow.

Adriel Lam

Homelessness is a broad label for an issue that includes, but not limited to financial
difficulty, mental health, personal choice and behavioral problems. Each needs to be
addressed according to the need presented. In the short term, we can continue to
support and allow the charitable organizations to do their work that monitor, care, and
address the needs of our homeless neighbors.

The long-term goal requires more commitment from our community to take ownership of
our public spaces, and awareness of our neighbors. We can be hospitable to people’s
needs, but we also need to set community standards and expectations with those
intending to utilize and occupy our public spaces.

3. Healthcare costs continue to rise. It has been reported that our local hospitals are seeing large deficits due to the uninsured. Access to healthcare is a human right, but we are reaching a crisis in the way our system is set up. What sort of plans do you have to fix this and ensure our hospitals stay solvent and that access is available to everyone?

Sherry Alu Campanga

We need to decouple employment from health insurance. Healthcare is a human right and we all deserve the same healthcare that is afforded to members of Congress. Socioeconomists around the world have proven that high quality, single payer healthcare is possible in the United States so it is up to our members of Congress to deliver it. Having a universal healthcare system in the US would also remove the market competition that exists between the companies that own our hospitals, resulting in better, accessible, and equitable care for patients.

Tulsi Gabbard

Our broken healthcare system is structured to increase the profits of big insurance and
pharmaceutical companies on the backs of the American people. This is despicable and
wrong. While the Affordable Care Act made some improvements like covering pre-
existing conditions, many serious issues remain, including extremely high deductibles,
escalating prescription drug costs, and ever-increasing medical expenses. Most
importantly, too many Americans still can’t afford to get the healthcare they need, and
with the dangerous cuts from the Trump administration and Congress, the matter is only
getting worse. All Americans should have access to affordable healthcare. I am a
cosponsor of the Expanded and Improved Medicare for All Act (H.R. 676) to extend
Medicare coverage to all Americans, do away with the expensive deductibles, premiums,
and copays that keep people uninsured or underinsured, burden small businesses, and
exist to the detriment of public health. We must ensure universal healthcare, demand the
government negotiate with pharmaceutical companies to bring down the price of
prescription drugs, and allow the re-importation of more affordable prescription drugs
from Canada.

Anthony Austin

I think we need and I would support a Single Payer Universal Health Care System.
Universal Healthcare is a right for all Americans. In order to achieve this I would work on
reducing many of the additional administrative cost associated with administering
Health Care.

Brian Evans
The crisis far exceeds just health care. Over 250,000 Americans die, every year, due to medical errors in hospitals. We also allow organizations such as LeapFrog Group to rate hospitals they’ve never stepped foot into. It doesn’t matter what insurance you have if you won’t walk out of the hospital. The first step is to make sure our hospitals are safe to begin with, as not one politician is discussing the unqualified physicians and nurses that plague many hospitals. Doctors have literally shown up for surgeries while intoxicated in this country. We need to immediately focus on this issue. Hospital lobbyists continue to fight the CDC from medical errors being listed as a “cause of death” on their annual top causes of death list. It would be #1 every year, but is not reported on death certificates and therefore the calculation could exceed 400,000 annually.
Ken Ito
Huge deficits because of the Good Samaritian Law that accect everyone at the ER. We have to protect and preserve Obama Care (ACA). Need to revisit cost to prescription drugs. And the Federal Government increase funding for Medicare and Mediaid.
Jarret Keohokalole
The Hawaii Healthcare Homeless Hui model is a great step in the right direction and needs to be expanded. Their H4 model--hygiene, health, housing, humanitarian--provides basic medical services to the most chronic homeless individuals in our community and keeps them out of ambulances and emergency rooms. In addition, the model gives service providers opportunities to move those individuals off of the streets and into more stable situations like Housing First. Emergency rooms and ambulances are not designed to treat chronic homeless in this way, but are currently forced to do so at immense cost to them and to the general public. This more proactive approach, aimed at a small portion of the population that utilize a high proportion of costly medical services, has already saved hospitals, EMS, and the overall healthcare system millions of dollars since it was initiated last year. This is a systemic change. For a comparatively much smaller investment, we are taking pressure off our first responder and hospital systems--critical components of our social infrastructure--by being innovative and proactive in our approach to homelessness. This model is working and we need to expand out the reach and support of these new initiatives to the Windward side and across the state.
Natalia Hussey-Burdick
Ultimately, I would like to see a nationwide single-payer healthcare system. It’s actually cheaper than our current Medicare system, and it ensures everyone has reliable access to healthcare with less bureaucratic red tape. In the meantime, there are things we can do to help on the state level to ensure everyone has access to affordable healthcare. I’ve been working with a handful of nonprofit organizations to codify various protections into state law, like prohibiting insurance companies for charging higher rates based on gender, and preventing denial of coverage for pre-existing conditions. We can help our hospitals stay solvent by committing state funds to assist hospitals who are serving the public need, and rethink our healthcare system to include neighborhood health centers that can handle most of our community’s basic medical needs. This would reduce the number of individuals who end up in emergency rooms because they can’t afford preventative care, and would help reserve emergency rooms for actual emergencies.
Scott Matayoshi
Finding a better way to treat the homeless is one way to reduce the burden on hospitals (see H4 above). I am also a strong advocate of preventative medicine, as a healthier population naturally requires less healthcare and has a higher quality of life. We need to make it easier for everyone to seek healthcare early instead of letting a health problem worsen until acute care is needed.
Mo Radke

It’ll be the kuleana of our federal officials to deal with the national health care issues. As a local elected official and as a starting point - My plans would be to commission a working group that includes; health care actuaries, a business analyst, representatives from Kaiser, HMSA, etc., Pharmaceuticals and other areas to get the real financial picture and to understand each business model as it relates to the Affordable Care Act, Medicare, Medicaid and other forms of insurance and health coverage. From good numbers, opportunities to implement the best programs for the state of Hawai‘i are created.

Shannon Kaui Dalire
Kika Bukoski
I beleive this question goes back to homelessness. I think part of the reason our hospitals are losing money – Queen’s reported a $40 million loss from health care expenses due to high needs homeless patients – is due to the number of minor cases of self-admitted homeless patients seeking care for non-urgent health needs which are not completely covered by Medicaid. I support a facility and/or facilities that are community based clinics and equipped to better handle non-urgent health care needs as a way to lessen the burden placed on our local hospitals.
Randy Gonce

The statement that ACEESS to healthcare is a human right is misleading. I believe that heathcare in it of itself is a human right. For instance we would not say access to free speech is a right. It is the action that holds that right. Therefore, we need to do everything possible to make sure we are covering every human possible with basic healthcare needs. We live in the richest country in the world in the history of people on this planet yet we make families go into massive amounts of debt to stay alive. It is morally wrong and not pono. Healthcare insurance companies have a business model that relys on keeping individuals sick yet the profits for insurance companies are very high. (https://www.hawaiibusiness.com/hawaiis-most-profitable- companies-2/). We need to move towards a model of keeping healthcare costs down by having a healthy population. Basic healthcare services should be provided at little to no cost our residents. We should not have to send a tourist like the japanese gentleman who was jumped, beaten, and spent days in the hospital, home with a huge medical bill. Again, our economic structure incentivises immoral behavior and we must work hard to change it.

Lisa Kitagawa

Many uninsured individuals who access healthcare, especially at private hospitals, such
as the Queens Medical Center, are homeless. Programs such as the Hawaiʻi Homeless
Healthcare Hui, H4, is an answer to providing comprehensive medical and other support
services to those in need. Programs such as this provide access to hygiene, healthcare,
medical respite and transitional housing. It is important for the State and City to continue

supporting efforts such as this to provide care for those in need. Encouraging private-
public partnerships, like those utilized in H4, will also help to address this issue and create more services.

It is also important to support the Hawaiʻi Prepaid Health Care Act (PHCA), which
requires that businesses offer health insurance to employees who work more than 20
hours a week for four or more consecutive weeks. With everything that is happening at
the federal level in regards to healthcare, it is important that we stay vigilant in making
sure that Hawaiʻi’s workers do not lose benefits and healthcare.

Jessica Wooley

There are so many challenges for government infrastructure and services today. We are in
trouble because there is not enough tax revenue to pay for existing needs for sewage treatment,
safe sidewalks, invasive species and vector control, mental health and addiction treatment,
early childhood and higher education and even disaster preparation. All of these deficits in
government will contribute to increased healthcare costs. And then there is the cost of rail...
I support public hospitals and basic health care for all people. That’s easy to say. Not only will I
work with others and support efforts to keep hospitals open and healthcare accessible to all
(including mental health and addiction prevention and treatment), I will support efforts and
introduce bills to decrease tax burdens on working families, promote jobs and economic growth
and increase State revenue.

Cynthia Thielen

THE HOMELESS POPULATION IS OVER STRESSING AND OVER USING LOCAL
HOSPITALS. I HAVE MET NUMBEROUS TIMES WITH CASTLE EXECUTIVES, ASKING
THEM TO INCLUDE A TRANSITION FACILITY ON THE NEW CAMPUS, SO HOMELESS
CAN SHELTER AND RECOVER FROM EMERGENCY ROOM CARE. THIS CAN PREVENT
REPEATED VISITS TO THE ER, WHICH IS TAXING THE SYSTEM AND NOT HELPING THE
HOMELESS PATIENTS RECOVER. CASTLE IS IN THE PROCESS OF PREPARING AN EIS,
AND I HAVE SUBMITTED SUCH COMMENTS AND ENCOURAGE OTHERS TO DO THIS.

Micah Pregitzer

We have to place caps on what insurance companies, pharmaceutical companies, and medical facilities charge for their goods and services.  That is the number one cause of the skyrocketing medical costs.

Miles Shiratori

We should make changes by creating legislation to expand health care coverage and improve
its affordability, particularly for low and moderate income americans. We need to improve the
access and affordability to create more provider networks, enchance competition among
insurers, improve consumers experience and strengthen the medicaid program.

Adriel Lam

Hawaii had one of the best health insurance networks in the country until we tried to
make one-standard national healthcare system. One size does not fit all. Let Hawaii take
ownership of its own healthcare system again and set policies that make sense for the people of Hawaii. Be proactive against cost-drivers such as fraudulent claims and frivolous malpractice suits, and increase the supply pool through agreements across
State lines.

4. Hawaii’s public school teachers are the lowest paid in the nation, yet our cost of living is one of the highest. Many teachers work multiple jobs to survive. Studies have also found that teachers really reach efficacy after 7 years, yet the turnover rate for teachers in our state is 5 years. How do you plan on addressing this problem? How do you plan on strengthening Hawaii’s education system?

Sherry Alu Campanga

The very first thing we can do as a community is vote for the Constitutional Amendment and secure dedicated funding for public education in our State. The high turnover rate in our state can be attributed to three things: 

  1. The high number of teachers in the DOE that come to Hawaii through Teach for America;
  2. The lowest pay for teachers, when adjusted for cost of living, in the nation;
  3. The high cost of real estate.

I would work to restore the $2.3B in cuts that the Trump administration is taking out of Title 2 funding. Title 2 is key to recruiting, training, supporting, and compensating our teacher workforce.

Tulsi Gabbard

I remain committed to supporting our teachers, improving their pay and benefits, and
making sure they have what they need to provide our keiki with a quality education. I
have fought to protect and increase funding for education programs, accountability
standards, and to help disadvantaged and underserved children.
Test scores alone cannot accurately measure the quality of a school. Every student
learns differently. In the 114th Congress, I supported passage of the Every Student
Succeeds Act (ESSA), which gives states more flexibility to determine the best way to
measure the success of our students and provides support for innovation, teacher
quality, STEAM education, and more. Now states can rely on more than just math and
reading test scores when determining a school’s success. They can look at things like
robust arts and athletics programs; full-time counselors, nurses, and librarians; strong
parent and family engagement programs; and rigorous AP classes and engaging
electives.

When ESSA was signed into law, it included language that I introduced to reauthorize
the Native Hawaiian Education Act, which provides grants for innovative Native
Hawaiian educational programs across the State of Hawaiʻi.
Earlier this year, I worked to pass increased funding for DOE Impact by $86 million;
increased funding for TRIO by $60 million; increased investment in Head Start by $610
million; and increased funding for Child Care and Development Block Grants by $2.37
billion—all of which were included in the 2018 Omnibus Spending bill and provide much
needed investment in Hawaiʻi programs that previously covered only 11% of eligible
keiki.
I also co-sponsored H.R. 4909, the Students, Teachers, and Officers Preventing (STOP)
School Violence Act to increase federal funding for schools in Hawaiʻi and across the
country to strengthen measures that prevent school violence. The bill authorizes federal
funding for increased investment in training students, teachers, other school personnel,
and local law enforcement officers on how to identify warning signs of potential violence
at a school and how to intervene to prevent people from hurting themselves or others;
better coordination between schools and local law enforcement; and school security
measures, including use of metal detectors, locks, lighting and other deterrent measures
at schools, security assessments of schools, and security training of school personnel
and students. This funding may not be used for arming teachers and school personnel,
or training in the use of a firearm.

Anthony Austin

Yes, I agree that our Education System needs some work! I support cost of living
increases to our underpaid and overworked employees within our Education System.
The teachers and staff are helping to develop the minds of our future generations.

Brian Evans
Once again, taxes must be raised on those seeking to do business in this state, or to purchase property. If you want the luxuries of Hawaii, then it comes with sharing in the responsibilities of making our state great for everyone, not just your portfolio.
Ken Ito
Recuitment and Retention is a very challedgeing matter. Various factors play a role in this issue. Low pay, school administration, poor morale, no teachers housing and cultual differences are some of the factors teachers are leaving this State.
Jarret Keohokalole
I support the significant raise that Hawaii public school teachers recently negotiated and earned. While that will help, to further strengthen Hawaii’s education system, we should deemphasize standardized testing and encourage the development of modern skills to meet the demand of growing private sector industry needs. Classrooms should be equipped with technology to create resilient students capable of adapting to rapid technological changes in a 21st century economy. Ultimately, teachers need flexibility to be able to teach lessons in the ways that they and their principals determine are the most effective for their students and communities. This process can’t continue to be dictated by the content in a national standardized test! Our state and economy do not need cookie-cutter molded graduates, we need thoughtful, dynamic young people who have been empowered to adapt to whatever changes are coming to our modern workplace. This requires a school system that has the flexibility to adjust to those changes. Teachers who are empowered to teach in this way and who have resources to support these efforts will be more successful and our overall education system will be better for it.
Natalia Hussey-Burdick
To me, it is absolutely unacceptable how poorly we pay our teachers here in Hawaii. Preparing our kids for the future is one of the most important jobs in the state, and it’s long past time we pay them accordingly and offer them the support they need to give every child a quality education. They should never have to take on a second job in order to make ends meet. In addition to better pay, there are all kinds of other ways we can help our teachers. Establishing tax credits for classroom supplies, providing state funding for Special Education teachers, and putting a public school teacher on the Board of Education would all have positive impacts on our educators statewide. Hawaii is unique in the way that we have a statewide education system, so any cost increase must be borne by the state budget unless we amend our state constitution to allow for property taxes to go toward public education. I strongly feel that second homes over $1 million should have a small percentage of their property tax go toward public education (especially since so many of those properties are being used as illegal vacation rentals) but the reality is we wouldn’t even need to do that if our state lawmakers simply adjusted their priorities: last year, we ended the fiscal year with a budget surplus of hundreds of millions of dollars. The problem is not that we don’t have enough money- it’s that our lawmakers are not making education spending a top priority.
Scott Matayoshi
As a public school teacher, I saw this problem first-hand. Between my first and second year of teaching, we had a 60% teacher turnover in my intermediate school. We need to support teachers, both with greater training for new teachers and with higher pay. We need to encourage high-quality candidates to enter the teaching profession and to stay in the classroom where they can impact future generations. I would like to see more programs offering PDE3 credit for young teachers to learn from more experienced teachers during the summer. I know how difficult it is to teach in your first year, and I believe a mentorship program would help new teachers who are feeling isolated and underwater in their classrooms
Mo Radke

I will increase teacher’s salaries by 25% as a starting point. I will find these funds by:

  • Supporting the Hawai‘i Department of Education’s (DOE) efforts to reduce their
    administrative structure as they streamline to more localized governance.
  • I will commission a work study to eliminate redundancies and inefficiencies within the
    DOE administrative structure.
  • I will secure permanent funding that directly supports teacher salaries, recruitment
    and retention. Recently proposed tourist or transient taxes are not steady streams of
    income and are subject to rise and falls of tourism.
Shannon Kaui Dalire
Kika Bukoski
Iʻve reached out to all the Windward complex schools in an effort to sit down and listen to their concerns and priority issues, including teacher retention. Iʻve been able to sit down with a few schools, and look forward to the opportunity to sit down with all Windward complex schools. It goes without saying, that teachers are a very critical piece in the future of society. Iʻve always beleived that aside from parents, teachers play a significant role in our childrenʻs live, as they spend the most time day in and day out, especially during their formative years, with our children. Investing in our teachers ʻISʻ investing in our children and in our future. The main theme that I’m receiving from our schools is that they need more funding to reach down to the school level – on a student-weighted formula, smaller schools are at a disadvantage. The schools with a smaller population have limited resources to maintain its campus and often times go without certain services as a result of budgetary restraints. I support legislation that provides these smaller schools with access to supplemental budgetary sources that provide for basic needs of the school like facilities maintenance, janitorial services, administrative support etc. I support legislation that not only funds education, but ensures that it reaches the school operating level(s), enabling the Principals to properly budget for its essential needs and to properly provide for our teachers. I believe teachers become teachers because they love to teach. Currenlty, our teachers are spending too much time worrying about things other than simply teaching. To reduce turnover, I believe we need to support policy that provides a positive teaching environment for our teachers and allows them to do what they love to do...ʻteachʻ. I also support policy that encourages and even requires active parental involvement in school activities. Active parental involvement can not only provide additional resources (at no cost) to the school administration and teachers, but can provide for a more positive and conducive learning environment in the clalssroom that is in turn supported and re-inforced at home which also can enhance a teachers teaching experience. I support funding parent outreach efforts to develop parental support of our schools and our teachers. As a parent who has always been involved in my childrens schools and related activities, I can personally attest to the tremendous potential that something as simple as ʻparental involvementʻ can make to a school, to a teacher, and most importantly...to a child. I support policy that reduce the amount of regulation and reporting that is currently required at the Department level and to reallocate those resources to the school level where the rubber hits the road. This would enable school administrators to properly manage and maintain their schools and their schools needs, including teachers and teacher retention. I also support policy that encourages parents ability to be good parents and to be more involved in their childs school experience. I realize that economically, this is not such an easy task being that alot of parents are simply busy trying to makes ends meet, but I absolutely believe that active parenting is the key to not only strengthening Hawaiʻiʻs education system, but addressing most if not all of Hawaiʻiʻs socio-economic ills. Parents have a vested interest in their childs success, so therefore have an equally vested interest in their childʻs schools success...if the school succeeds, so does their child. An active parent can not only improve a childs school experience, but can serve to re-inforce positive growth at home as well.
Randy Gonce

As a former teacher who has been in our public school system I am well aware of the hardships our teachers face each and every day. Teachers and our keiki are absolutly undervalued and underpaid. The public schools barely have the resources to make ends meet but if you poke your head into Iolani or Kamehameha schools, you will see a drastic change. These private schools have been invested in by parents in form of tuition. Our state has not been paying their ʻtuitionʻ to our public schools so to speak. Our state has not made our keiki or their education a priority and it is painfully obvious. I would champion a dedicated revenue stream for our public schools and education. This would help fund outdated facilities, professional development for teachers, updated textbooks, fund creative school programs, etc. Each child has a different set of needs and learning styles/capabilities. We need to allow our teachers who spend most of the time with them the ability to cater to these children as they see fit. This cookie cutter 1- size-fits-all model only holds our children back. Also, a creative approach to attracting more local teachers and keeping them here is teacher workforce housing. Housing is the #1 cost in HawaiʻI and the teachers are underpaid. Providing our teachers with housing would free up their income to be put directly back into our economy and afford the high cost of HawaiʻI all while keeping them in the communities they love.

Lisa Kitagawa

As a graduate of Hawaiʻi’s public schools including Castle High School, a parent of
children who attend/will attend public schools, a PTA President, and the daughter of a
30-year retired elementary Windward public school teacher, supporting Hawaiʻi’s public
education system is one of my highest priorities. I agree that teachers are underpaid
and we need to improve the recruitment and retention of qualified teachers.
In order to address this problem and to strengthen Hawaiʻi’s education system, I support
the constitutional amendment, which will provide a direct source of funding for public
schools. If voters decide to allow a surcharge on investment real property to go to public
education, this would provide additional funding for teachers and schools (this
surcharge will not affect most individuals in Hawaiʻi, as it focuses on those who have
investment properties, which are second or third homes). Hawaiʻi is the only state that
does not have a dedicated funding source for education and does not use property
taxes to fund education. Providing more funding to public schools and using those funds
to increase teacher pay will help to recruit and retain more teachers.
It is also important to partner with our educational system and help connect local
community groups to the schools to support education. As Benjamin Parker Elementary
School’s ʻOhana (PTA) President, I am looking at ways that we can encourage parents
and community members to volunteer at the local public schools to share their wisdom
and provide additional support for our students.

Jessica Wooley

Please see my answer to number 3. We must increase salaries and benefits for teachers,
creating incentives for teachers who stay for 7 years or more and decentralize decision-making
for the Department of Education (giving local schools and parent organizations more options to
succeed, improve and innovate). At the same time, we must ensure there is transparency,
accountability and consequences for decisions and schools that fail our students.

Cynthia Thielen

I SUPPORTED AND VOTED IN FAVOR OF THE CON AMENDMENT. ASSUMING VOTERS
WILL APPROVE THIS MEASURE, THEN I WILL WORK TO BE SURE THE NEW MONEY

GOES TOWARD TEACHERS, AND TO THE LOCAL SCHOOLS, RATHER THAN BEING
SCOOPED UP BY THE DOE BUREAUCRACY.

Micah Pregitzer

Hawaii is the only state without a dedicated source of funding for its public education system.  Every couple of year, the teachers have to enter negotiations with the state and hear over and over again that the state doesn’t have the money to pay the teachers fairly, to reduce class sizes, to provide services for special needs students, to build and repair facilities.  This year in the general election in November, the citizens of Hawai’i will have a chance to change that. The teachers Constitutional Amendment to provide Schools Our Keiki Deserve places a surcharge on real properties in Hawai’i specifically for these purposes. Its intention is to set up a revenue stream that only taxes non-primary residences that are valued over $1 million.  This has the potential to bring in around $500 million/year specifically for education, and it will not put an undue burden on the average hawaii resident!

Miles Shiratori

I would make education an issue that will make it a top priority in order to build the foundation
for future prosperity and quality of life. I would protect our children from gun violence, create a
bill to have a security detail on all campuses, provide a better school enviroment and stronger
neighorhoods, and prepare our children as future leaders. I would set a goal to create a strong
community enviroment that supports better schools and student achievements by using state
and city services and resources. I would work with our schools, education leaders and parents
to build a partnership that encourages excellence in the classrooms and support academic
success.

Adriel Lam

We need to bring the Kaneohe public education system under local control, allow more
autonomy for Kaneohe people to administer and govern our local school system. Fifty
years of running a statewide bureaucracy, with a centralized budget, paying over $13,000
per student annually, isn’t a model for efficiency. Unload the increasing administrative
burden we place on public school teachers and support them in their professional
development through continuing education and exchanges. At the same time, allow
industry professionals to partner with schools, teachers, and students in the classroom.
Our local businesses have a vested interest in producing working professionals of the
future. Let’s strive to keep the local Kaneohe businesses and community involved in the
development of future generations.

5. Public Mental Health care is seriously lacking in Hawaii. What would you do to improve the cooperation between agencies and provide services to everyone who needs it?

Sherry Alu Campanga

I am not sure that lack of cooperation is the primary limiting factor to mental health access in most areas of Congressional District 2. For most of rural Hawaii, the limiting factor is simply the lack of mental health professionals. As a foster mom whose foster children qualify for public mental health services, what I’ve found is that access is limited by the lack of mental health professionals that are accepting new patients. Again, in this case, the high cost of real estate and the high cost of living is what typically drives counselors, therapists, and mental health doctors out of Hawaii. The positions are available, but many go years without being filled because people can’t afford to take those jobs. In instances where federally funded mental health services aren’t accessible by local agencies, I will make it my job to identify those barriers and fix them.

Tulsi Gabbard

More than 32,000 adults and 12,000 children in Hawaiʻi are living with serious mental
health conditions, yet less than half receive the services they need. To help bridge the
gap that has long existed in mental health care, I worked to pass the Helping Families in
Mental Health Crisis Act to better connect those dealing with mental illness to
community-based services, promote early intervention and treatment, increase access to
tele-medicine for underserved and rural communities, and remove access barriers to
Medicaid and Medicare for adults and children who need treatment. The legislation helps
address a nationwide shortage of nearly 100,000 inpatient beds, encourage states to
provide community-based alternatives to institutionalization, and increase funding for
suicide prevention research and outreach programs. This bipartisan legislation will help
make it so that those in need have better access to the treatment and mental health care
they deserve. It includes key measures to empower parents and caregivers, drive
evidence-based care, drive innovation, reduce the shortage of crisis mental health beds,
increase services to underserved and rural populations, advance early intervention and

prevention programs, encourage alternatives to institutionalization, focus on suicide
prevention, and more. I will continue working with our community, providers, and
government agencies to help deliver services to those who need them.

Anthony Austin

I work with a number of Nonprofit Organizations in my line of work. These Organizations
are out their in the field so they have information and education resources. I think if we
bring together more of these Nonprofit Organizations and agencies together to
strategically plan a system to combat this issue of Public Mental Health, we will Be
Better able to address it.

Brian Evans
We need to provide incentives to bring more qualified doctors to the state.
Ken Ito
The Legislature has tried to pass a bill that will give Psychologist (Ph.D) prescription authorization and to diagoise patients to address this issue but it didn’t pass. We also need more social workers to help with the patients. We can also draft MOU between public and private agencies to work more closely with the prevention and treatment of the patients.
Jarret Keohokalole
We must begin by destigmatizing mental health and allowing people to feel comfortable in seeking help. We must invest in our schools where many of these issues begin, including supporting anti-bullying initiatives. Substance abuse so often exacerbates mental health problems and our state agencies need the tools to quickly get individuals into comprehensive treatment. We need more psychiatrists and other licensed professionals to meet this growing demand.
Natalia Hussey-Burdick
Because mental health and substance abuse are often closely intertwined, experts have coined a new term called “Behavioral Health” that encompasses both issues while still allowing space for either to exist independently of the other. This issue has tragically touched almost every family in Hawaii, and we clearly don’t have enough service providers to meet our needs. There are currently fewer than 10 residential behavioral health treatment facilities in our state that accept Med-Quest, and some neighbor islands don’t have any. Unfortunately this number is even lower for treatment facilities that offer help to minors, so individuals under 18 that are suffering from mental health or substance abuse are forced to relocate to the handful of treatment facilities that exist on Oahu, which often separates them from their families and creates immense economic hardship. This also directly contributes to our homeless problem, since many of our houseless ohana have lived with these issues for years and have nowhere to go for treatment. But there is hope. Research shows that with resources like in-home treatment, case management, and easy access to therapy and psychiatrists, people with mental illness and addiction can thrive in society. Our state does not do a good job of providing and/or publicizing these resources. We must implement statewide and county-specific campaigns, clearly listing our available resources on each island so that people living with behavioral health challenges know where they can turn for help. A critical element for success will depend on the state developing a single electronic health record system that all providers can access. This will streamline patient diagnoses and ensure that patients are not offered duplicate treatments that have failed with previous service providers.
Scott Matayoshi
This ties partially into my homelessness response, which I will not repeat here. Our district is unique in that it contains the State Hospital. I’ve spoken with a number of district residents who are employed or were employed at the State Hospital in my three walks through the district, and have had a chance to pick their brains about solutions in making the State Hospital safer for both patients and the surrounding community. Higher fences were not one of the solutions. We need better solutions that engage patients and motivate staff to prevent the constant escapes and poor conditions at the State Hospital. We also need to provide services to homeless that are suffering from mental illness. I would like to see the State partner with IHS to create more programs like Street Medicine, which my wife and I financially support.
Mo Radke

Like my previous comments on homelessness, I would incentivize the organizations who do well and produce results. Conversely, I would consider removal of funding from those government agencies who do not meet their mission requirements.

Shannon Kaui Dalire
Kika Bukoski
In 1993, a lawsuit was filed on behalf and in favor of Jennifer Felix, a disabled student on Maui, better known as the Felix Consent Degree. Since then resources have dwindled and the lack of community-based mental health services is becoming as bad as it was prior to the Felix Consent Decree and according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hawai’i has one of the greatest teen suicide attempt rates in the country. In 1984, ACT 218 established the State Council on Mental Health, created to advise the Department on allocation of resources and statewide needs. The Council is made up of Hawai’i residents from various state agencies, mental health services, education, vocational rehabilitation, criminal justice, housing and social services. I support efforts outlined in the 2018 report to the Legislature and Governor’s office updating the strategic plan to 1) Develop a fully functional State Council on Mental Health website, 2) Develop a process to identify, review, and respond to legislative bills related to mental illness and substance use, 3) Recruit and retain State Council and Service Area Board members to become fully staffed, 4) Invite experts in the field of sex trafficking to increase our knowledge related to this critical issue, and 5) Continue to work to de-stigmatize mental illness and access to services in our state.
Randy Gonce

This is an area that we need drastic change. There are so many agencies inside of our state system that deal with the issue that the majority of them do not speak to one another. The non-profits in our state do such a better job at actually making progress in addressing mental health care because they do not have the beruocracy and red tape that our state does. Our state runs these public services for mental health like a buisness and not as a public service as it should. Until we can really trim the doubling of efforts and bring in more professionals for mental health we need to have a central agency that organizes and manages this crisis. This agency would designiate roles, tasks, and prioritize addressing this issue. This agency would NOT be a political process with appointees. Once in place then there can be an assesment of which services need to be increased. I would bet that outreach and compassionate care services would be near the top.

Lisa Kitagawa

While walking door-to-door in our community, I have learned that many families in our
district know someone who is affected by mental health concerns, and these numbers
continue to be on the rise in our state and across the nation. Children and youth, adults,
elders and their family members are all affected by mental illness, alcoholism, or drug
and substance abuse, and this can affect individuals regardless of race, age,
socioeconomic background, etc. The first step in addressing this problem is removing
the negative stigma that is often associated with mental health care and mental illness.
It is important to support organizations that promote awareness and education about
these issues, so that community members can become more knowledgeable about the
challenges that individuals are facing.
It is also important for the State to support the Department of Health (DOH) and its Adult
Mental Health Division (AMHD) with much needed funds. The DOH AMHD provides
services to those with serious mental illness who are under or uninsured or those who
require the care and custody of the department. With the Hawaiʻi State Hospital in
Kāneʻohe, it is important that we support mental health care efforts to not only help
those individuals, but to keep our community safe.

Jessica Wooley

Please see my answer to number 2. I absolutely believe in bringing agencies together to
collaborate with organizations, community leaders and the legislature (including my office,
should I be elected) to ensure services are being provided to all who need them. To garner the
momentum, authority and focus for collaborative efforts to be successful, I will work with
community leaders to establish priorities and strategies that will ensure local needs are met. If
elected, the next step would be to work also include organizations and relevant State agencies
to draft legislation and advocate for budget priorities and capital improvement projects so that

we will successfully address community priorities. Key to our successes will be leadership at all
levels of government and funding (please see my answer to number 3).

Cynthia Thielen

THIS IS A FUNDING ISSUE, AND WE HAVE ALLOCATED FUNDS FOR THE WINDWARD
STATE HOSPITAL. WITH THE IMPROVED PLANT AND MORE FUNDING, THERE SHOULD
BE IMPROVED SERVICES.

Micah Pregitzer

Public Mental Health Care is another area that has been underfunded in Hawai’i for a log time.  This exacerbates and already serious problem by allowing many of the issues worsen instead of addressing and trying to remedy them.

Miles Shiratori

I would create a better understanding between all the different agencies and departments to
share and communicate their different views to each other and use all the different resources
and skills that needs to be applied in solving problems as to how we can make better use of the
system to take care of the people that are mentally challenged. This way we will be able to help
everyone who needs the help by creating a better understanding of what these people need.

Adriel Lam

A good place to start is seeing where the agencies have failed to cooperate. Is there an
existing policy that hinders better coordination and communication between agencies?
What can be done to break down those unnecessary barriers?

6. How great a threat do you think climate change poses to the State and what, if anything do you propose to mitigate the threat?

Sherry Alu Campanga

Climate Change is an immediate threat to our State and the physical evidence is apparent across our country (primarily along our coasts). We must respond to this threat as a global community by reducing, and eventually eliminating, our use of fossil fuels for energy. The first thing I would do in Congress is repair the damage that this administration has done to the EPA and its green energy programs. The second thing I would do is support meaningful legislation to reduce fossil fuel use and support alternative energy development (particularly in the area of transportation).

Tulsi Gabbard

Across our islands, we’ve seen the devastating impact of climate change firsthand, from
record-breaking flooding on Kaua‘i, to rising sea levels eroding Honoapiʻilani Highway on
Maui, and much more. In Hawai‘i, we grow up with an appreciation for our environment
and an understanding that taking care of our 'āina, water, and air is our kuleana.
We must end our country’s addiction to fossil fuels and do all we can to protect our
planet and our future. In Congress, I’ve introduced the Off Fossil Fuels for a Better
Future Act (the OFF Act) which lays the groundwork to reach 100% clean energy
production by 2035. The bill would end fossil fuel subsidies, which give billions of dollars
to the oil industry, and support investments in clean energy, infrastructure
modernization, green jobs, and more.
Other environmental legislation I’ve worked on includes the following:
 I introduced the Coral Reef Sustainability Through Innovation Act of 2017 to
award grants that promote coral reef research and conservation.
 I secured $6.5 million in federal funding for rural communities’ groundwater
programs and $222 million for the environmental restoration of formerly used
defense sites, including 117 locations in Hawaiʻi.
 I cosponsored the Water and Energy Sustainability through Technology Act to
improve water sustainability in Hawaiʻi and across the country.
 I voted to uphold the Clean Air Act and stop harmful legislation from unraveling
protections for our planet and public health.
 I introduced the Macadamia Tree Health Initiative and Areawide Integrated Pest
Management Act to encourage invasive species research.
 I fought to maintain federal funding for sustainable farm programs and the
University of Hawaiʻi College of Tropical Agriculture and to increase access to
food stamps, including allowing their use at farmers markets.
 I secured federal funding for our local agriculture industry, including $1.6 million
for a new farming facility and training programs in Waiʻanae and $3.194 million
for agricultural education grants for Native Hawaiian Institutions.
 I cosponsored a bill to reauthorize funding for the Land and Water Conservation
Fund to protect natural areas, water resources, and cultural heritage sites in
Hawaiʻi and nationwide.

 I cosponsored the Organic Agriculture Research Act to more than double federal
funding for organic agriculture research.
 I have also consistently voted against the Keystone XL Pipeline and joined
thousands of military veterans alongside Water Protectors at Standing Rock to
oppose the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.
I continue to champion efforts that combat climate change, support clean energy, and
protect our fragile environment. As a lifelong environmentalist, I am grateful to have
earned endorsements from the Sierra Club, League of Conservation Voters, and Ocean
Champions, among others, and received the “Friend of the National Parks” award from
the National Parks Conservation Association.

Anthony Austin

I think Climate Change is not only a threat to Hawai’I, but also to our Nation. My
research and education had led me to understand the real threat. Doing away with fossil
fuels and investing in cleaner energy solutions is one way to mitigate Climate Change.
Getting out of our cars and riding Public Transportation is another way we can help
mitigate Climate Change.

Brian Evans
Accept science. That would be a good start.
Ken Ito
This session 3 bills were passed that hopefully help with climate change.
Jarret Keohokalole
I believe climate change is a huge threat to our state and the world. In 2017, I was proud to support Act 32, which solidified Hawaii’s commitment to fighting climate change by adopting the Paris Climate Agreement into state law. This act provides us with the legal authority to continue climate mitigation efforts regardless of the federal government’s stance on climate change. Going forward, I continue to support the Hawaii 2050 Sustainability Plan and strategic efforts to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels. Like many local people, I was raised to believe that we must do everything we can to take care of our environment and leave it better for future generations.
Natalia Hussey-Burdick
Climate change is a huge threat in Hawaii, especially to our coastal communities. I think we’ve all seen how our coastal roads are disappearing, especially on the road to North Shore. Fortunately, the legislature just passed a bill requiring all future Environmental Impact Statements to consider Sea Level Rise, so we can build our infrastructure smarter and better the first time instead of spending taxpayer’s money to correct the problem and mitigate the effects later down the line. Another aspect of climate change is resilience to natural disasters, which is especially important to us as one of the most isolated land masses in the world. Right now, we import about 90% of our food and energy, which leaves us very vulnerable if something should happen to our harbors. I would like to see a statewide shift toward more sustainable agriculture and local food & energy production, so we’re better suited to provide for ourselves if an extreme weather event renders our ports unusable.
Scott Matayoshi
Climate change and sea level rise are huge threats to our State, potentially displacing tens of thousands of people and submerging $19 billion of property. Unfortunately, there is little Hawaii alone can do to stop climate change, not that we shouldn’t do our part! We can mitigate the impact by starting to plan for it now, through zoning changes and building requirements. New homes built too near the ocean or that are not elevated enough to withstand the inevitable rise of sea level should not be permitted. Large-scale infrastructure such as power plants and treatment plants should be constructed inland. The special management area can be redrawn to reflect the future coastline, especially in low-lying areas. We need to mitigating the effects of climate change now; to be proactive instead of reactive.
Mo Radke

We are an island community and should be on the cutting edge of sea change impacts. We have an economy that is primarily driven by tourists who enjoy our climate and proximity to the ocean. Simply ignoring sea-level changes for the sake of our tourist trade is short-sighted. We need to spend less time convincing and denying and spending more time in planning. Our planet is in a constant climate change pattern and, unfortunately, in this case, our global population and their “antics of existence” are accelerating that change. In Hawai‘i, we have several world-class environmental engineers, ocean engineers, and development experts. Let’s get them together and listen to their ideas.

Shannon Kaui Dalire
Kika Bukoski
We are an island state... as such we are completely at the mercy of any change in sea level or other natural occurence for that matter, that alters our environment and/or our physical surroundings. I think the first thing we need to do is pay attention to what is happening around us and the rest of the world, and to accept that there isnʻt any ʻoneʻ solution that will address issues like sea level rise and/or erosion. I believe the state has taken some significant steps in mitgating some of these changes in our environment. In 2017 (ACT32) created the Hawaiʻi Climate Change Mitigation & Adaption Commission and called for the Sea Level Rise and Adaptation Report which lays out a comprehensive approach to mitigating an estimated 3.2 foot sea level rise by 2100 or in some opinions as early as 2060 which may impact thousands of acres of land and shoreline property. I support implemeting policy consistent with the findings of the newly created Commission and any subsequent reports and/or findings that are presented. I believe it is important that we take a proactive approach to developing sound methods of modeling and predicting any occurrence that threats Hawaiʻi and/or its communties. With that said, I believe Hawaiʻi is on the leading edge when it comes to environmental awareness and has adopted good policy such as the Carbon Sequestration Initiative recently announced. I also believe the stateʻs Net Zero Energy By 2035 intiative is also a positive step in doing everything we can to maintain our island state. I believe Hawaiʻi is the most richest in natural resources and can serve as an example to the rest of the world on how sustainable a community can be by utilizing its natural resources in a repsonsible and respectful way. As I stated earlier, I donʻt believe there is any one solution, but many solutions that we need to consider and implement in order to maintain Hawaiʻiʻs shorelines from sea level rise and erosion. I would continue to support efforts to reduce and reuse as opposed to landfilling. I would also support efforts to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels and increase the adoption of policy that supports the use of available and relaible technology that reduces our carbon footprint. In previous roles and capacities and as a Native Hawaiian, I recognize my Kuleana as a steward of Hawaiʻi and have been an active participant and strong advocate for alternative means of providing for our needs while preserving and protecting our valuable resources. I will continue to advocate for such in any role I play.
Randy Gonce

An enormous threat. Not only is climate change posing a threat on the world but our you do not need to be a scientists to see the drastic impacts it is having on our islands. Coral reef in Kāneʻohe bay are bleaching, we are seeing increased flooding due to heavier conistant rain effents, species are dying out due to the sea temperatue warming, and much more. To address this threat we need, again, a complete change in the way we do and think about things in our state. The introduction of The Office of Climate Change, Sustainability, and Resiliancy is wonderful but we have yet to see the state equip them with the resources neccasry to tackle the huge task of climate change. In fact, they have already had their budget slashed and staff cut. To fund this office and more efforts combat climate change we should be charging/taxing those responsible for the externalities (unintended consequences) causing the climate to change. A carbon tax would be a great place to start.

Lisa Kitagawa

Growing up in Kāneʻohe, I have always loved being surrounded by the Koʻolau
Mountains and Kāneʻohe Bay. Over the years, I have seen changes to our environment
and am concerned about the future of our community. As a legislator, I will make sure to
protect our watersheds, farmlands, and the lush beauty that we all love about our home.
Climate change is definitely affecting Hawaiʻi in a negative way. Sea level rise/king
tides, hotter temperatures, negative effects to animal habitats, etc. are results of climate
change. We need to look at supporting efforts that decrease our carbon footprint and
reduce the effects of climate change by supporting more renewable energy efforts.
Supporting current State efforts, as well as companies that create renewable energy
sources, such as through biofuels, and solar, ocean and wind energy, is an important
part of reducing our dependence on outside oil sources. It is also important to continue to encourage the public to consider using renewable energy sources, like solar energy.
By continuing to provide tax incentives to convert homes to solar energy, we will be able
to reduce our dependence on outside sources for energy and help to reduce climate
change.

Jessica Wooley

Climate change poses great threats to the Hawaiian Islands, not just because there is and will
be sea level rise, ocean acidification and increased hazardous weather events, but because
State commerce and economic growth already have been and will be increasingly impacted. I
wrote many bills while I served in the legislature from 2008-2014 and made specific
recommendations to address these issues when I served as the Director for the Office of
Environmental Quality Control that can be seen in the Annual Report submitted to the Governor
in 2015 (go to http://oeqc2.doh.hawaii.gov/EC_Reports/Forms/AllItems.aspx and select the
2014 Annual Report). To mitigate, we must do more to reduce the use of imported fossil fuels,
promote renewable energy in all sectors and invest in technologies and jobs that will reduce
risks and reverse the negative effects of climate change. At the same time, we need to adjust
and prepare for challenging changes. (Recommendations I made include, for example,
consolidating agency programs and creating one agency to focus on the environment and
sustainability issues and utilizing the Genuine Progress Indicator to provide comparable
economic, social and environmental data before consequential choices are made by
government.)
In our community in particular, I would work tirelessly to collaborate with and build upon efforts
by Kāko`o `Oiwi, Papahana Kualoa, Hui Kū Maoli Ola and Paepae O He`eia, the University of
Hawai`i, Hawai`i Institute of Marine Biology, in concert with the new National Estuarine
Research Reserve (NERR) to restore and improve the He`eia ahupua`a and the health of coral
reef and ocean wildlife resources in Kāne`ohe Bay. These efforts will mitigate risks and effects
of climate change while promoting recreation, economic activity and benefits, subsistence living
and food abundance.

Cynthia Thielen

CLIMATE CHANGE IS ONE OF THE MOST SERIOUS ISSUES FACING THE STATE. AS A
FORMER ENVIRONMENTAL ATTORNEY, I HAVE BEEN ONE OF THE LEADERS
PROMOTING LEGISLATION TO PREPARE HAWAII FOR SEA LEVEL RISE AND CLIMATE
CHANGE.

Micah Pregitzer

As a state consisting of islands, climate cange impacts us greatly.  Here in Hawai’i we are blessed with an abundance of clean natural resources.  To do our part to mitigate the effects of climate change it is paramount that we invest more into those renewable energy sources and break our reliance on fossil fuels shipped here

Miles Shiratori

The true impact of climate change is going to be very hard to predict. The impact on fishing, to
rising temperatures, energy usage and the shifting of global climate change will force us to
adapt quickly to the change. We need to rally the people, business’ here and around the world
to start making the changes that is necessary to help stop climate change and together we have
the power to limit the effects of climate change.

Adriel Lam

The climate continues to change as in centuries past. We’ve all originated from distant
shores in search of a better environment, and lucky we now live in Kaneohe. The way to
mitigate a threat is to keep your options open, explore, innovate, and adapt. The worst
thing is to commit to policy changes based on politically or financially motivated
projections, and to make sweeping decisions with drastic unintended consequences.

7. Our workforce is rapidly changing. It is predicted that by 2030 over half of our labor force will be freelancers. What will you do to help prepare our young people to function in the gig economy?

Sherry Alu Campanga

Universal Basic Income is a long term goal of mine. UBI has positive effects that include encouraging people to find work/gigs, reducing business administration costs, increasing entrepreneurship, nonprofit work, altruism; and increasing mental health for individuals and families.

Tulsi Gabbard

The traditional notion of what it means to have a career is rapidly changing. In generations past, our parents and grandparents often sought jobs that offered the security of long-term employment, health benefits, and secure retirement plans—all with the same company and over the course of decades. With the advance of technology, our generation faces a new reality that includes the burgeoning “gig economy.” The “gig” concept is reaching nearly every corner of the economy, and with it, come new opportunities for those who seek independence, need the flexibility that a 9-5 job doesn’t offer, or work to make extra cash to help make ends meet. These opportunities also come with unique challenges that are new to this generation, and it’s important to understand how the gig economy works. Freelancers and independent contractors need to know what their legal rights and responsibilities are within the “gig” economy—whether they’re working with a popular platform-based organization like Lyft, Uber, or Postmates, or they’re working as a finance, tech, or public relations small business owner. The financial literacy skills necessary to navigate the gig economy are in some ways very different from those needed for a traditional job and will need to be incorporated into our education system. We should also make sure that small business loans and incentive programs are adapted to fit the gig economy and help entrepreneurs set up shop, get established, and succeed in what can be stressful and uncertain times.

Anthony Austin

I’m actually already doing my part by owning and running a successful Business
Consulting Firm. I want to bring more business to Hawai’I, by helping those who need
help understand the importance of Business Ownership.

Brian Evans
Provide incentives for companies to hire locals. Or, force the issue by an increase in taxes if outside companies don’t want to help those who live here.
Ken Ito
The next generation is already in the New Economy and they will meet the challenges of the future. The State has provided the innovation center with low rent, and the University of Hawaii to assist them. They can also work for the City and County, the State or the Federal government because they provide good benefits.
Jarret Keohokalole
I believe our community needs to prepare our youth to be adaptable and multiskilled. Private sector employers have made it clear that industries are rapidly changing and young people are inheriting a world that requires multiple intelligences. We need better technology in classrooms. We must support more STEM curriculum in public schools. And we should encourage the DOE and University system to work closely with DBEDT and the business community to stay updated on emerging industries and develop curriculums to meet the demands of the 21st century economy in a proactive way. Too often, employers are recruit for skilled, high-wage positions from outside of Hawaii because of the lack of qualified talent in Hawaii. At the same time, local graduates continue to move away seeking higher paying career opportunities. We need to do better to make sure our students have pathways through our schools to the high demand careers that exist in Hawaii.
Natalia Hussey-Burdick
There are pros and cons to freelancing work. While many employees appreciate the “freedom” of these types of jobs, most or all of the legal risk is typically shifted from the company to the employee. This means the employee bears the cost of the insurance, equipment & maintenance, and must suffer the brunt of any fluctuations in the market. I support workers’ rights to unionize and collectively bargain, and would encourage any group of workers in the “gig economy” to do so if they would like to improve their working conditions. This is another reason why it is so important to modernize our public school curriculum so our youth graduate with the tools they need to be competitive in the modern workforce. It is critical that we teach students how to handle their own taxes, health insurance, plan for retirement, and to know their rights under the fair labor standards act. I’m excited to hear that Castle High School has incorporated community volunteering and resume writing into their curriculum, and I would like to see all schools throughout our entire state require similar Senior Projects.
Scott Matayoshi
I’m not convinced the gig economy will come to fruition at that scale, but if it does, we need to focus on education and preparing our students to deal with a new kind of employment. In a gig economy, workers will need to be much more sophisticated about healthcare, taxes, and saving for retirement. We need to make sure students learn the life-skills they need before graduation.
Mo Radke

To effectively answer that question, one would have to understand the types of jobs that will be available in 12 years. Will we be so far along in Artificial Intelligence that the need for workers reduces drastically? Will a driver’s license renewal be as simple as an eye scan and eye test at the DMV? Or even at home? I believe we need to move into the future with our eyes wide open and truly understand that the change that’s coming will be akin to the industrial revolution at the turn of the 20th century.

Shannon Kaui Dalire
Kika Bukoski
I believe we need to prepare our economy, more than our young people, to function in a gig economy where its estimated that over half of our labor force will be freelancers. We are not quite certain how the growth of a gig economy will impact our economy let alone individual freelancers. First, it’s unclear if a gig economy offers the long- term security that employment with a conventional business and/or corporation might provide its employees (unemployment insurance, workers compensation etc.), and second, a gig economy, due to its lack of tax collection and accountability, may eventually have lasting adverse impacts to our socio-economic well-being and implode our economy. I believe we need to continue to study and analyze the potential impacts of a gig economy on our socio-economic well-being, and support policies that protect individual worker’s, rights, protections, and benefits.
Randy Gonce

This is an area that I am very excited about. This shift in our econonmy and the way we
run things in our state that I have been commenting about a lot can really come into
focus in this answer.
The gig economy is a result of our economic model not working well for our people and
labor. We are seeing more wealth and profits go to fewer individuals and more people
becoming worse off. Thus, people are utilizing all resources they can to try and generate
income for themselves. In many ways it has sprung some great innovation in our
economy but we are all still fighting for the ever shrinking pieces of pie.
What we are seeing today is an increase of people utilizing the “Internet of Things” for
work. This includes blogs, YouTube shows, websites to sell goods, etc. This is changing
the way our capitalist market has worked. Traditionally our economy has encouraged
buisnesses to reduce their marginal cost (The increase or decrease in the total cost of
producing one additional unit of an item) to as low as possible. This way profit will
increase. What our current economic system has not accounted for is people being able
to produce products for a marginal cost of zero, nada, close to nothing! The Internet has
given us the ability to start becoming ʻprosumersʻ not consumers.
For example, look at the newspaper buisness. We have seen a huge decline in physical
print newspaper companies and subscriptions. Most of the smaller newspapers have
been bought out by the larger ones and we only see a few monopolies left (example:
The Star Advertiser). This is due to individuals being able to provide the same service
that newspapers did, in some instances even better, for zero cost. On the internet you
can now share videos instantly, stories, articles, etc. without having to read the
newspaper for information.
This is already happeneing for 3 key areas that will spur a new economy or “industrial
revolution” so to speak.

  1. Communication – which we are already seeing the huge effects the communication
    internet has on our lives and economy.

  2. Energy – Renewable energy such as solar has been getting cheaper and cheaper.
    Sooner rather than later each home will be producing energy instead of buying it
    from an energy company. It then can be shared over the internet. For example if you
    and your neighbors all have solar and are connected to a co-op grid together, you
    could then share the energy you do not use with your neighbor. Homes will be
    producing and sharing green energy in the very near future.

  3. Transportation – Also in the very near future transportation will all be set up online.
    For example Tesla already has operational driverless trucks that deliver goods to
    different locations. In our lifetime we will see the production, transportation, and
    energy used to produce a product all be automated and completed online.
    This chances everything. We need leaders in place to make our new econonmy a
    “sharing economy” or what is called a “collaborative commons”. We are all in this

    wild ride we call life on earth together. We have to start acting like it by supporting
    one another. This new sharing economy is the future where we free ourselves from
    mundane labor to do the things we enjoy or work in non-profit sector, the fastest
    growing sector in our nation. We will start doing work that impacts one another and
    brings people together.
    Having the right leaders in place to make this shift is crucial. If not this new economy
    could be used to only further the collection of power and money to an even smaller
    group of people. That would be very dangerous.

Lisa Kitagawa

It is important to educate our young people about the pros and cons of a gig economy
by partnering with high schools across the State to provide this information. With the
increase and advancements in technology, more opportunities are available for
employment in non-traditional settings (those that our economy has been based upon).
Gig work has increased over the years in areas such as arts and design, computer and
information technology, media and communications, and transportation.
Gig economies offer individuals with opportunities to pursue a variety of passions all at
once (such as freelancing to do graphic design, website design, and being employed as
an Uber or Lyft driver), as well as provides them with the flexibility to create their own
schedules and manage their time.
Young people also need to be aware that gig economies can also have a downside,
such as the inconsistency of work and lack of benefits, such as sick leave and
retirement. Those who are freelancers also need to be able to manage their schedules
and have a high level of organizational skills.
It is important to provide young people with honest and comprehensive information
about what it means to be a freelancer. With the increases in cost of living and the
possibility of needing to provide for a family, it is important that young people know and
understand the benefits and challenges of being a freelancer in a gig economy.

Jessica Wooley

To prepare young people for the future, I support all efforts to ensure the private sector and
government work together to promote entrepreneurial models of success and invest more in
education, from early education to after school, to vocational and higher education. I would also
promote innovation, technology and access to broadband in all sectors of the economy.

Cynthia Thielen

THE BOARD OF EDUCATION SHOULD AUTHORIZE MORE INNOVATIVE SCHOOLS,
INCLUDING TRADE SCHOOLS, ALLOWING STUDENTS TO CHOOSE WHICH ONE TO
ATTEND. BE IN FRONT OF THE CHANGE, RATHER THAN TRYING TO PLAY CATCH-UP.

Micah Pregitzer

Continuing to expand the DOE CTE programs to ready our future workforce for the changes ahead.  That doesn’t just mean teaching them the skills, but partnering with agencies that provide certification and community groups to allow mentorships by trained professionals in the fields of interest.

Miles Shiratori

I really don’t see by 2030 that over half of our labor force will be freelancers. Because Hawaii is
a very service oriented/hospitallty state. It is very much driven by our tourist economy. But if it is
going to be a gig economy then we will have to start training our children by learning
technology at an earlier age.

Adriel Lam

Get back to the basics of education. Learn to read, read to learn, people learn the best
from information they are motivated to acquire for themselves. Know the basic sciences
and be able to evaluate and discern fact from fiction. Develop interpersonal skills. As in
most jobs, your vocational skills are half of the job, you still need to work with and
through other people. Overall, be mindful that the gig economy will also evolve over
time, teach people to be adaptable to change.

8. Our windward communities transportation infrastructure is designed to accommodate cars. How would you provide safe commutes for pedestrians, bikes and wheelchairs to travel from our neighborhoods to our community cores?

Sherry Alu Campanga

Complete Streets have already started to appear on the leeward side of Oahu. In Hawaii, with its aging population, our Complete Streets should also include small electric transportation (e.g. golf carts, GEM cars). As a member of Congress, I would ensure that US Department of Transportation TIGER 2 grants for Complete Street planning is available in suburban Hawaii too.

Tulsi Gabbard

Providing safe, walkable communities for our residents wherever possible must be a priority. Last year, Congress came together to pass a long overdue transportation and infrastructure bill that reauthorized critical funding for our highways, bridges, and other infrastructure, transportation safety, and public transit projects in Hawaiʻi and across the country for the next five years. I will continue to advocate for these important projects and funding that ensures the federal government prioritizes its investment in infrastructure—and not just for cars, but pedestrians, bikes, and wheelchair and stroller users too.

Anthony Austin

I think the Complete Streets Program is a jumping off point with modifications to get
more people out and active.

Brian Evans
I do not have an answer to this question yet.
Ken Ito
The Kaneohe Neighborhood Board #30 in 1988 has allready did a study that address this problem. The Chairman was Elaine Murthy. This study was basically was to realine traffic patterns.
Jarret Keohokalole
I want Windward residents have the opportunity to travel safely via foot, bike, and/or wheelchair. I actively work with constituents, state, and city officials to identify areas where there are safety concerns and work to get them addressed. With that said, we must balance our need to create various ways to move around our community without worsening traffic, parking, and encouraging disruptive types of tourist traffic. Finally, this process will require intensive community dialogue and outreach, and I have worked hard to apprise the community of what is going on and how they can seek information and participate in the process.
Natalia Hussey-Burdick
This is one of the most common concerns people tell me about as I go door to door. Kaneohe has some of the least pedestrian-friendly streets on the Windward side, yet I always see pedestrians walking (or driving wheelchairs) down the roads because the sidewalk is nonexistent or in disrepair. It is dangerous, and it is not ADA compliant. The good news is, the Complete Streets project is in the planning phase for improving our roads in Kaneohe. The City is also working on updating the Windward Bus routes. I have worked with our City officials on both of these projects, providing comments and suggestions for all the main problem areas that people have told me about. Improving sidewalks and intersections, updating our public transportation system, and making our streets more walkable will not only make our community safer; it will also help alleviate traffic which is becoming a growing problem for us here in Kaneohe.
Scott Matayoshi
We need more sidewalks in the Windward community, to allow pedestrians and those in wheelchairs more access to public transportation. I would also support bike lanes if reasonable, but right now it seems bike lanes are being installed without practical thought to the communities they might affect. While I do want to encourage transportation by bike, we need to also consider driver and biker safety, as well as community impact, on the changes we make.
Mo Radke

As it relates to Windward communities, commutes are mostly by car and over the Pali, Likelike, H3 or Kalanianaole. By contrast, Kāne‘ohe town is positioned more as a business district. By using community input as integral to projects such as Complete Streets and other innovations, we can ensure protections for our pedestrians and generate smart solutions like efficient crosswalks, bike lanes and SIDEWALKS! If the Kāne‘ohe business district were to be re-designed as a community gathering place and more amenable to walking, biking or sitting, considerable design work would be needed to create the space and still provide access for important infrastructure like sewer, water, drainage and electrical. I would like to see a large park-and-ride area where bus commuters do not have to park in neighborhoods that are near to bus stops.

Shannon Kaui Dalire
Kika Bukoski
The needs and desires of one community may or may not be the needs and desires of another. District 48 is comprised of two distinct communities and each have expressed a variety of opinions when it comes to the design and connectivity of our streets and highways. It’s important that we continue to engage our community and involve them in every step of the process. A Statewide Pedestrian Master Plan was published in 2013. Subsequently, the City finalized the Honolulu Complete Streets Design Manual in 2016 which established standards specific to Honolulu, utilizing ʻComplete Streetsʻ principles that offer solutions to accommodate pedestrians and motorists alike. Currently, the City is conducting outreach efforts to implement proposed complete streets improvements throughout the Kāneʻohe/Kahaluʻu area. Although I believe itʻs important to use such references as a guide, we must also continue to solicit and consider views and opinions from those that use these streets and roadways on a daily basis.
Randy Gonce

This is an area I am familiar with in regards to Urban Planning. For a long time we have created means of travel for our population cenetered around automobiles. It has been the main means of transportation for a very long time now we have to start thinking more long term in regards to sustainability and practicality. We now have 3 times the amount of cars then people on the islands. We are seeing a huge increase of abandoned vehiciles because there are no places to store the massive amount of cars and no place to recylce them. We need to change our mindset and expand beyond the automobile centered society and urban planning we have been doing for so long. While automobiles will absolutley still dominate as the prime mode of transportation we need to make it easier for other alternatives to be utilized and encouraged. Currently it is unsafe to be a bicyclist on the majority of our road ways in Hawaiʻi. We also have a very high rate of pedestrian deaths. Redesigning roads, crosswalks, and throughfares with the individual in mind and not the automobile is crucial to progress.

Lisa Kitagawa

The Complete Streets project in Kāneʻohe is looking at ways to redesign our streets to
provide safe transportation for those traveling by foot, bicycle, transit and automobile.
The first step of the project included gathering data to come up with a design for the
community. It is important that the community continue to be involved in this process
and provide feedback on the design that the project will present.
It is important to look at the various locations across our community that allow for the
creation of space for safe transportation by pedestrians, bikes and wheelchairs without
taking away space for cars to travel. A large concern of our community is the increase in
traffic congestion so it is important to make sure that by providing safe commutes for
pedestrians, bikes and wheelchairs, we are not creating a bigger problem of increased
traffic congestion. It is also important to examine the impact on our community and local
residents before moving forward with the creation of new space for various forms of
transportation.

Jessica Wooley

We must provide more and safer options for all people to travel within our neighborhoods – that
is the reason I have worked to create and support Complete Streets policies (and the reason I
was the only legislator to receive a Complete Streets Award). I will continue to fight for the
implementation of community supported Complete Streets projects at all levels of government.
That means in some areas, there should be safe sidewalks and separate bicycle lanes. In
addition, government must partner with the private sector to provide more shuttle service and
ride-share options.

Cynthia Thielen

THIS IS A “COMPLETE STREETS” QUESTION, PRIMARILY UNDER THE JURISDICTION OF
THE CITY. THERE HAS BEEN SIGNIFICANT PUSH BACK FROM USERS OF HAMAKUA,
AND THE LESSON IS THAT THE CITY SHOULD INVOLVE THE COMMUNITY IN CHANGES
BEFORE THE CITY IMPLEMENTS THEM. ROADWAYS THAT HAVE A DEDICATED BIKE
LANE, WITH SIDEWALKS FOR PEDESTRIANS AND WHEELCHAIRS, CAN IMPROVE
LOCAL COMMUNITIES.

Micah Pregitzer

Tourism in Hawai’i brings in over $16 Billion in revenue each year.  Some of that money the tourism industry is profiting off of needs to be invested back into the infrastructure to repair, maintain, and make the improvements suggested

Miles Shiratori

I would increase funding to put more bike lanes and pedestrains need to use crosswalks and
stop using their phones when crossing. Also bikers can use our bus systems where they need
to go, also same goes for people in wheelchairs and the handicap they can use the bus system
or they can use the handivan.

Adriel Lam

Our Windward Oahu transportation infrastructure is still functioning under designs to
accommodate 1970s era transportation technology and roads. With today’s advances in
technology, there are many more innovative options and solutions to transportation
issues. Our community has grown beyond the size and scope of Honolulu sub-district.
Policy meant for an 800,000 urban metropolis is not a one-size fits all for our town of
35,000 people. Let Kaneohe prioritize and decide what makes the best sense for our
people.

9. What would you do to help improve the resilience of our Windward​Communities in response to a tsunami or major hurricane?

Sherry Alu Campanga

In the wake of natural disaster, immediate assistance for victims (e.g. evacuation, food, and housing) often comes from members of the impacted community. I would investigate and establish a program that reimburses altruistic members of the community in a way that is similar to the State’s program that reimburses people who provide respite care for those in our foster care program.

Tulsi Gabbard

We are so fortunate to live in Hawaiʻi, a place filled with tremendous beauty and natural resources. However, we have some seasonal disasters that are unique to our state, and it’s important to be prepared. There are many kinds of natural disasters that can impact our islands. Because of their level of devastation or frequency of occurrence, our top three hazards are hurricanes, tsunamis, and flash floods. However, earthquakes, volcanic activity, landslides, wildfires, and pandemic outbreaks are also all potential threats that we have and continue to experience in devastating ways. That’s why it’s important for people to be individually prepared, for our government to continue to invest in hardening our infrastructure to protect against devastation, and to provide resources towards disaster response. The most important thing for individuals is to have an emergency response plan and supplies in the event of a disaster. Every year, just before hurricane season begins, I send postal mailers with the most up-to-date information on how families in Hawaiʻi can get prepared, what supplies to include in their emergency kits, how to make an emergency plan, and how to stay informed in case of an emergency. I also provide this information in my office, on my website, by email, on social media, in town halls, and at the \\\"Congress on Your Corner\\\" public outreach events that I regularly hold across the district. I have hosted telephone town halls on hurricane and disaster preparedness with over 5,000 constituents joining the call, as well as Hawaiʻi Emergency Management leaders from every county, to discuss the forecast for the upcoming hurricane season, review new recommendations, and answer questions from the community. When these disasters occur, we as a community need to come together to support those who are most negatively impacted. We fight for federal funding, work with the state and county, community leaders, and service organizations to mobilize and deliver support to those who need it. We continue to see an outpouring of aloha for the people of Kauaʻi and Waimanalo who are still recovering from record-setting rainfall and flooding in April that wiped out many homes, left communities isolated due to landslides, and required hundreds to be evacuated. Over the past several weeks, thousands of people on Hawaiʻi Island have seen their homes, livelihoods, farms, and businesses devoured by lava. For those impacted by this crisis, day-to-day life remains difficult and their futures uncertain. Help and support for basic needs are sorely and urgently needed. Thankfully, we were able to get quick approval for FEMA Individual Assistance to help Hawaiʻi Island residents who have been displaced, and we continue to seek the same assistance for Kauaʻi residents. This funding will assist with things like temporary housing, home repairs and replacements, medical needs, child care, transportation, and more.

Anthony Austin

Emergency Preparedness Education! I already am a Board Member with Ko’olaupoko
Emergency and Response and also a member of the Community Emergency
Preparedness Team. Outreach and Education is the Key!

Brian Evans
I would seek to engage federal assistance that provides immediate help that avoids any red tape or processes that only delay providing such help.
Ken Ito
The Emergency Preparedness Group has plans that address this problem. The public needs to be educated to response in this type of environment. The community emergency response team has courses that the public can take to assist in emergency situation.
Jarret Keohokalole
I have handed out 8,000 disaster preparedness kits in Kaneohe and Kailua and consistently feature disaster preparedness information in my newsletters. Throughout my time in office I have engaged with and promoted our local Community Emergency Response Teams to keep our Windward communities informed. I also maintain an email newsletter and consistently publish information on disaster preparedness and community resiliency, including a recent five week series on different types of preparedness resources.
Natalia Hussey-Burdick
This is something that’s been on my mind since last year’s exceptionally active hurricane season, when I walked door to door delivering emergency preparedness guides to families in my neighborhood. Our state and county agencies need to be better about promoting the resources that are available (for example, a widely publicized list of which school buildings are designated storm shelters) and invest in community preparedness training programs like CERT (Community Emergency Response Teams). With the cooperation of HPD and HFD, I would like to implement monthly CERT training sessions on the Windward side, to train community volunteers to provide first aid and rapid assistance in the event of an emergency. In addition to promoting community response efforts, the State also needs to boost preparedness efforts, especially for our most vulnerable populations. I’d like to pass a bill that appropriates funds and requires all DOE schools to maintain an emergency supply of necessary goods (food, water, and medical supplies) in case a disaster strikes while our students are in school.
Scott Matayoshi
We need secure shelters for people to go during times of disaster, and to ensure community members have the supplies they need at home to weather a storm or tsunami. Better education and demarcation of the tsunami evacuation zone will help with the immediate response to a disaster. Updating older structures and homes to hurricane-proof them will also help mitigate the damage.
Mo Radke

Using Kailua as an excellent example, I would support community efforts to obtain CERT qualification along with the recruitment and retention of younger Kāne‘ohe residents to help bring us into the future as CERT team leaders and coordinators. I would engage the Castle Education Complex to add age-appropriate vignettes for classroom comment and discussion so that when in high school, the transition between a disaster and what a person can do to help, is made easier through understanding.

Shannon Kaui Dalire
Kika Bukoski
Ensure that our communication systems and local area resources are adequately funded and supported to protect our communities in case of disasters. One of the first services to be compromised in such emergency situations is our electric and communications. Currently, our utilities are provided above-ground which in high wind, oheavy rain or hurricane situations are vlunerable to damage and/or destruction, to include damage to property and human life. I support effots to work with the communities impacted, the utilities and the Public Utilities Commission to study and analyze the cost and benefits of undergrounding our utlities to improve such resiliency. The 2018 Legislature introduced House Bill 2582 which was intended to establish the Hawaii Disaster Preparedness Task Force to discuss and review current disaster management coordination and other functional components of disaster planning, and to develop recommendations for the UH Manoa National Disaster Preparedness Training Center to develop a Hawaii Disaster Preparedness Plan. I would support reintroducing similar legislation to that would provide for a comprehensive approach to understanding our weaknesses, identifying soutions and developing a plan to ensure that our communities are informed and as prepared as possible. Additionally, we need to encourage our residents to recognize that we are all individually and collectively responsible for our own safety and response to disasters, rather than expecting government to be the only resource in cases of disaster or emergency situations.
Randy Gonce

This questions is really one of self sustainability. Currently Oʻahu only has a reserve supply on island for about 7 days if a disaster would take out our port. This is frieghtening when you realize how remote our islands are. Hawaiʻi used to be 100% sustainable roughly 200 years ago. It took that short amount of time to become 95% or more dependant on outside resources. We must return to the old ways of sustainability and marry them with modern knowledge to better prepare for natural disasters. Hurricanes and tsunamiʻs are real threats but also other disasters such as man made ones like our cesspool issue could eventually cause a huge issue. If we were to be able to produce the majority of the food we consume, the materials we use to make homes/clothes/neccesities we could withstand any storm.

Lisa Kitagawa

Education is key to improving the resilience of our Windward Communities in response
to a tsunami or major hurricane. We need to continue to have community events that
educate and promote preparation for natural disasters. Partnering with private
companies and non-profits, such as the Hawaiian Electric Company or the Red Cross,
to disseminate information to the community about what would happen in the case of
an emergency is also important. It is also important to encourage everyone to speak to
your neighbors and family and friends about the importance of being prepared and
having safety/preparation kits and plans ready, as well as helping one another if a
disaster does happen.
I also think that including emergency preparedness programs at the local high schools
will help to educate our community about the need to be prepared for natural disasters.
Children and youth can be great advocates to help educate their parents and family
members about the need to be prepared. It is also important to engage various groups in the community, such as neighborhood watch groups, and have them share
information about emergency preparedness.

Jessica Wooley

I would collaborate with the existing organizations working on this issue (the Community
Emergency Response Team, Federal, State and City and County emergency management
agencies, etc.) and encourage community leaders themselves to create their own organization
to prioritize actions and help the community prepare. I would also work to build on past success,
including the passing of Act 76 – a community-based law I wrote to address hazards that
changed the way hazardous rocks and trees are addressed statewide.
While I served as a Representative for District 47, I worked closely with residents in Hau`ula in
particular to create and implement a disaster preparedness plan, which includes emergency
food and shelter for the community. Hau`ula created an amazing model that can be replicated,
and I will work in collaboration with any and all interested community leaders and organizations
to do the same. I support community-led preparations because it is the community members
and leaders themselves that must be ready when disaster strikes. Government can assist to
provide resources, but it is the community members themselves (all of us) that will respond first.

Cynthia Thielen

I WORK WITH AND SUPPORT THE WORK OF KAILUA NEIGHBORHOOD BOARD MEMBER
CLAUDINE TOMASSA, WHO HAS TAKEN THE LEAD IN THIS AREA. SHE SPONSORED A
WELL-ATTENDED WINDWARD PREPARDNESS EVENT, AND WE NEED TO CONTINUE
THESE QUARTERLY AT LEAST.

Micah Pregitzer

One of the major problems being one of the most isolated land masses in the world, is that when a disaster strikes, we can be completely cut off from the rest of the world for quite some time.  The best way to be prepared for such circumstances is to be less reliant on outside goods and produce more of our own.

Miles Shiratori

We are all in this together, we all need to prepare a plan in case we do have a major disaster
and we need to rally everyone in our communities not to just think about it but to talk about it so
we can have a plan of action. We need to create teams in every community who can help start
putting these plans into action and to educate the community. We can all get disaster booklets
from Hawaiian Electric and the City. As a resilient community you should be able to sustain
ouselves for at least two weeks. Always be prepared never let your guard down.

Adriel Lam

Taking personal responsibility is the first line of defense. That means personal
preparedness for emergency and security situations, through training in First Aid, CPR,
home security, self-defense, and keeping adequate supplies of food and water at home.
This allows emergency personnel to focus on the most critical needs, instead of catering
to every individual problem. Encourage and provide for training of individuals, groups
and businesses to build the collective resilience of the community as a whole.

10. What is the biggest issue facing your district?

Sherry Alu Campanga

The biggest issues in Congressional District 2 (housing, mental health, cost of living) can all be traced back to our depressed economic situation. In CD2, the most important issue to work on now is revitalizing our economic engine by identifying and then capitalizing on areas of economic opportunity in agriculture, art, technology, and remote services in the areas of IT, finance, and healthcare.

Tulsi Gabbard

There are many issues facing the people of Windward Oʻahu and our state, the biggest of which is our high cost of living and an extreme shortage of affordable housing. Our residents and their families, many of whom have lived here for generations, are being forced to leave Hawaiʻi because they simply cannot afford to stay here. Recent reports indicate that in Hawaiʻi, it takes an hourly wage of $36.13—or an annual salary of $75,150—to afford a two-bedroom rental. On Oʻahu alone, there are only 40 affordable rentals available for every 100 extremely low-income renters. We must treat this housing shortage like the crisis that it is and tackle it by bringing together a disaster-response team made up of county, state, and federal representatives working with the private sector to cut the red tape and expedite the building of more affordable housing units that will stay that way—and not be flipped and sold for profit, as we’ve seen happen too often in our islands. There is a wide-range of additional issues that face the people of Hawaiʻi and also deserve attention here. We\\\'re currently facing an emerging opioid epidemic that, if left unchecked, could lead to a serious public health crisis. Our broken criminal justice system, to include the outdated marijuana prohibition, continues to levy a grave fiscal and social cost to our communities, and families are being torn apart. Health care premiums and prescription drug prices are skyrocketing. There are still significant shortfalls in veterans’ benefits and healthcare, both in availability and quality of care. We must enact real comprehensive reform to our broken immigration system. Threats to our water, land, and our environment continue in many different areas. These issues and many others affect the lives of people all across the 2nd Congressional District, and I will continue to do all I can to fight for the well being of our families and our planet.

Anthony Austin

Keeping the WindWard side Country. As I was part of the Kahalu’u Neighborhood Board
that was issue an Very important subject of discussion, and dealing with our house less

population. I think more resources and outreach is needed to get our house less into
homes.

Brian Evans
Low teacher pay, unqualified medical personnel, and local politics that play too big a role in the system of law and how it’s applied.
Ken Ito
Homelessness, traffic and education.
Jarret Keohokalole
The lack of affordable housing. I was born and raised in Windward Oahu and have seen family and friends move out of the district (or the state) in order make ends meet. Most young residents in our district who are working full time jobs have no realistic shot at owning a home. The rental market is unaffordable and shrinking. Young people are fleeing to the mainland just for the opportunity to own a home and not have their entire paycheck go towards rent. Something is systematically wrong when lifelong Windward residents are unable to afford to live in their hometown. I will do everything in my power to continue to fight for policies that: 1) stimulate the development of more housing for working families, 2) provide certainty that that housing is affordable, and 3) discourage abuse of the system through the development of monster homes and illegal TVUs. My children and my neighbors’ children deserve the opportunity to grow up in our home district. I will fight to make sure that happens.
Natalia Hussey-Burdick
It’s difficult to narrow our complex struggles down to a single biggest issue, especially because a lot of the issues we face are so closely interconnected. I think the most painful problem for our community right now is the increasing rise in homelessness, which is a tragic combined result of our inadequate public school system, a critical lack of affordable housing, poor wages and worker benefits, insufficient services for our veterans and people struggling with behavioral health issues, drugs, and so much more. The state is reporting a 9.8% reduction in homelessness this year, but I volunteered to help count the homeless this year for the annual Point-In-Time count and I can tell you firsthand that statistic is inaccurate. We only had about 30-40 volunteers counting all the homeless individuals on the Windward side, and when we canvassed the usual parks and bus stops in Kaneohe, it was like a ghost town that week. It looked as if there had just been a recent homeless sweep. There was not a single person camping out in their usual parks and bus stops, and I only found 10 people who reported sleeping on the streets of Kaneohe town. I can’t say for sure whether there was actually a sweep or whether the individuals were just hiding from the count, but I do know that we can’t just keep ignoring this problem and providing statistics that say it’s getting better without actually addressing the root causes of homelessness in our community. It impacts all of our families and the people who live nearby, and I know we can do better. That’s why I’ve been fighting for solutions to these complex, interconnected problems for the last 10 years, and I’ll continue to stand strong for our community in our State House of Representatives.
Scott Matayoshi
My district has many seniors living on their own in their homes. I want to make sure we support them so they can remain comfortably in their homes for as long as possible. Preventative medicine and exercise programs will help keep seniors healthy and save us costs in the long-run. Once seniors require care homes, the costs can be overly burdensome on both families and the State.
Mo Radke

Unmitigated development. Like many other ahupua‘a, Kāne‘ohe and Kailua are unique in a variety of ways and are also very separate. Cosmopolitan living and a rural feel are intertwined. Development is needed in some areas, and in others, it needs to be left alone. So, here goes: Developers are focused on development. Good developers are focused on development as a dance with their partners - those partners being the community and the ‘aina. We sometimes mistake community uproar for NIMBYism (not in my backyard) when we’re actually speaking for the ‘aina - because essentially, we are the voice of the land. With better-developed plans that carefully consider cultural practices, water supplies, the need for places to live, agriculture and more efficient infrastructure for homes and business, we will better value the richness of the little space we have left. I will help developers and communities find the “sweet spot” so that what is planned can serve us now and our keiki into the future.

Shannon Kaui Dalire
Kika Bukoski
Affordability/ Infrastructure. As a former legislator who served in the State House of Representatives in the early 2000’s, I see many of the same issues that we struggled with back then continue to exist, and in some cases worsen. I see it becoming increasingly difficult for our young local residents to survive and thrive on the windward side. As someone who has been fortunate enough to grow up and live in both Kāneʻohe and Kahaluʻu, I have seen our community change over the years, some for the better and some not so much. As I walk door to door, two issues have become glaringly apparent...the cost of living in Kāneʻohe/Kahaluʻu and across the state has quickly grown out of reach for many local residents. I was fortunate enough to purchase my first condo on Kahuhipa St. which at that time was considered a fairly affordable area not only in Kāneʻohe but on Oʻahu. I cannot say that is the case today. I was shocked to see that an older and very modest single family home in the Kāneʻohe area was being listed for nearly one million dollars. To exacerbate the issue, the continued proliferation of non-resident and illegal transient vacation rentals continue to drive up the cost of housing and directly competes with the local housing market. I support efforts to protect our neighborhoods and provide affordable housing opportunities for our local residents. Infrastructure. The sewer systems in some areas are antiquated and need to be upgraded and modernized to handle the waste water needs of the community while protecting waterways and natural resources from being compromised and contaminated in times of heavy rainfall and flooding. The cost of such upgrades should be implemented as to minimize and/or mitigate any financial impact to resident/owners. Streams, waterways and resevoirs need to be properly managed, maintained and routinely dredged to minimize flooding and property damage due to heavy rainfall and flash flooding.
Randy Gonce

The biggest issue facing District 48 is the unsustainability of our economy (which includes our housing market), our ecosystem, and the state overall. Our state needs to have a long term and short term vision for the health and success of our islands. Currently, I see a vision that is cenetered around self serving, profit making, and exploitation of all the things we hold dear to us a residents of Hawaiʻi. Our housing market is going great for foreign investors and not local people. Our tourism industry is booming for foreign owned buisnesses and the tourists but is destroying our ecosystems. All the things we hold dear as people of Hawaiʻi such as, time off with our family, enjoying nature in its purest form, eating some of the freshest food in the world, etc.., it is all being comprimised by our current status quo. We need fresh faces with fresh ideas and people who are willing to push the envelope. We don’t elect individuals to carry on with the current status quo. It is up to our voters this year to make that change and I am happy to be the candidate to represent that. Mahalo!

Lisa Kitagawa

I think the biggest issues facing my district are the high cost of living, lack of affordable
housing and the increase in homelessness. These are the top concerns that people
have shared with me as I walk door-to-door. Other topics that have been shared with
me frequently are the need to support our educational system here in the district, as
well as traffic and road conditions/concerns.
My heart is to serve my community. I am committed and passionate about serving the
place where I grew up and the place where my children will call home. I want to ensure
that Windward Oahu is a place that my family, friends and community are proud to call
home and that it is represented by someone who values its unique past, understands its
present challenges, and passionately believes in its hopeful future.
If there are any questions or concerns, I would love to hear from you. Please contact me
at vote.kitagawa@gmail.com or 808-548-9708. Thank you.

Jessica Wooley

For so many, it is affordability. Whether it’s taxes and fees, the high cost of housing, food and
medicine or low wages, many people are struggling to get by or suffering. Poverty, hunger and
homelessness are indicators of affordability challenges, and government can and must do much
better to address the most pressing issues of the day, before bigger catastrophes strike. That is
why I’m running for office -- the legislature desperately needs qualified, motivated and
determined legislators to solve problems, and quickly. Please also see my answers above.

Cynthia Thielen

IN KAILUA, QUALITY OF LIFE IS IMPACTED BY THE AREA BEING “DISCOVERED” BY
THOUSANDS OF TOURISTS PLUS TOO MUCH HOUSING BEING BOUGHT BY
MAINLAND/OVERSEAS OWNERS AND USED AS UNPERMITTED TRANSIENT VACATION
UNITS. LOCAL RESIDENTS ARE STRUGGLING TO RETAIN A RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITY,
AND I AM WORKING WITH THEM. THE POSSIBLE LANDLORD INDUCED CLOSURE OF
PALI LANES, THE BOWLING ALLEY THAT IS THE GATHERING PLACE FOR SO MANY
LOCALS, IS ONE OF THE CHALLENGES WE FACE. I PERSONALLY HAVE MET WITH THE
LEADERSHIP OF A&B TO URGE THE CORPORTATION TO ALLOW PALI LANES TO
REMAIN. CORPORATE PLANS ARE TO REPLACE THE LOCAL BOWLING ALLEY WITH A
PLAZA FOR TOURIST SHOWS AND OTHER USES.

Micah Pregitzer

For the windward side, and most of Hawai’i, that would be the rapidly rising cost of living.  Illegal vacation rentals and real estate speculation, result in low supply and high demand in the housing and rental market. Current short term rental laws need to me enforced more stringently.  Affordable housing units need to be created with rent controls need to be implemented, as well as affordable units for same cannot be allowed to be quickly sold at market value.

Miles Shiratori

The biggest issue would be our aging infrastructure, we need to fix our state highways which
hasn’t even been touched since Obama was President and get the city moving on fixing our city
streets also. We need to maintain a strong, virbant Windward Oahu and have a strong
sustainable economic growth that creates jobs, allowing to keep commitments and to create
new opportunities for generations to come.

Adriel Lam

Apart from the other pressing issues that are frequently talked about, I’d like to highlight
our Kaneohe streams. It’s the lifeblood of communities defined by the ahupuaa. Let’s
make the Kaneohe streams safe and usable spaces again. Let’s interconnect our
communities with walking, biking and wheelchair accessible paths. Let’s take ownership
of the maintenance and care of our streams and break down the barriers that divide our
communities. Let’s make Kaneohe more than just a place to hang your hat at night to
sleep for the night. Let’s make it the thriving community that cooperated and brought the
first night of electricity to Kaneohe. We can do so much together as a community, when
more of us are able to take responsibility for our neighborhoods.